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The text for Mirror Image says:

the duplicates move with you and mimic your actions [...] If an attack hits a duplicate, the duplicate is destroyed.

Does this mean that my warlock can cast Mirror Image, slay an opponent in the first two rounds, then spend the remaining eight rounds giving himself one high five after another? Then wave goodbye to the three images when the spell duration expires normally?

Or does one high five from the caster destroy his own duplicate? One destroyed image with each flat palm slap?

Assume that at the end of round two, no opponent has hit a duplicate, and the three original duplicates are still present when celebratory hand gestures commence.

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    \$\begingroup\$ What practical purpose does this serve? What problem are you trying to solve with this question? Why does this need to be mechanically possible instead of just "fluff" that happens? \$\endgroup\$ – Purple Monkey Sep 17 '20 at 4:17
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    \$\begingroup\$ @PurpleMonkey If an Illusionist was able to high-five a figment of themselves, it would obviously betray higher-level casting than required to cast Mirror Image. Seeing such a wizard accomplish this feat would confirm them as more of a potential threat than if they could only cast 2nd level spells. \$\endgroup\$ – Axoren Sep 17 '20 at 20:03
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Essentially, no

The mirror image spell description states:

Until the spell ends, the duplicates move with you and mimic your actions, shifting position so it’s impossible to track which image is real.

Giving a high-five to your duplicate is impossible since they are duplicating your actions while moving around you. It would require one to mimic your actions in such a way as to appear to give you a high five but you have no control over their movements in order to position one suitably.

If you do manage to "touch" one, it won't vanish, since the spell description states:

A duplicate can be destroyed only by an attack that hits it.

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    \$\begingroup\$ What if you put both hand up? You'd (eventually) get at least a high-five, if not a high-ten. \¤/ \$\endgroup\$ – Aaron Sep 17 '20 at 9:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Aaron - If the mimicry is exact, then you would never be able to be face-to-face with one of your duplicates, since they would turn left when you turn left, etc. You would only be able to look at their backs. And you couldn't even slap the backs of their hands, because their hand would move forward the same as yours. \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Sherohman Sep 17 '20 at 10:40
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    \$\begingroup\$ You wouldn't have to be faceing them for an elevated hand-slap. You only need proper positioning, and that is constantly shifting, as the spell describes. Throw your hands out enough times, and you'll eventually make (visible) contact, but you would never actually touch anything. Since it has no effect on the game, other than for fun, there's no reason why a DM shouldn't allow a high-five \$\endgroup\$ – Aaron Sep 17 '20 at 16:33
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Unless there's magic involved a simple high five will not cause any damage to be taken or count as an attack so high five away!

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    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to RPG.SE! Take the tour if you haven't already, and check out the help center for more guidance. \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Sep 17 '20 at 4:44

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