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I am having an issue calculating how to utilize a Satyr's Mirthful Leaps trait, and how it would affect the character moving forward, focusing on the math and stats. For this question, I'll use the satyr monster stat block's 12 Strength as a fair basis, and assume perfect rolls for maximum distance on the 1d8 from Mirthful Leaps.

The description of the satyr playable race's Mirthful Leaps trait states (MOoT, p. 25):

Whenever you make a long or high jump, you can roll a d8 and add the number rolled to the number of feet you cover, even when making a standing jump. This extra distance costs movement as normal.

While the rules for jumping state the calculation for a long jump as:

When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump. When you make a standing long jump, you can leap only half that distance. Either way, each foot you clear on the jump costs a foot of movement.

Adding everything together as I understand it, a satyr can either clear a 20-foot-long chasm with a 10-foot running start (12 feet based on their Strength score, +8 more from Mirthful Leaps), leaving them 5 feet extra in case something goes wrong; or the satyr can clear a 14-foot-long chasm ([12/2]+8) without a running start.

This means the satyr has the ability to use nearly all their movement in one long jump, correct?

If that is correct, then I have a follow up:
If your satyr had to cross a terrain during 1 round by leaping from platform to platform (say, to cross a river, or to avoid the many pit traps in a sealed hallway), how would Mirthful Leaps be applied?

  • Without a running start, would each leap be up to 14 feet long?
  • Would that only apply to the first jump?
  • Or would the "Mirthful Leap" of the prior jump be considered a running start for the next, allowing them to jump to the next platform up to 20 feet away?

Edit: Though I am thankful for the answers to the above questions, I have decided to reinstate the question omitted in corrections, as I have still not been able to find understanding on this matter. Though I agree that the linked question does address the application of the mechanic, it doesn't seem to address the terms used that lead to my confusion.

Boots of Striding and Sprinting (emphasis mine):

While you wear these boots, your walking speed becomes 30 feet, unless your walking speed is higher, and your speed isn't reduced if you are encumbered or wearing heavy armor. In addition, you can jump three times the normal distance, though you can't jump farther than your remaining movement would allow.

  • Given a satyr, with a strength score of 12, would be able to long jump using up to 30 of their 35ft movement, and standing long jump twice to gain 28 of their 35ft movement thanks to their mirthful leap ability, would this not make the increase in the jumping distance a rather a moot point, given you'd spend one attunement to gain 5 out of the 24ft jump increase?
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    \$\begingroup\$ Related: Is Mirthful Leaps affected by jump multipliers? \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Markov Nov 28 '20 at 19:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ I removed your second question as that seems to have been asked and answered. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Nov 28 '20 at 20:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Thomas, I saw that answer, but I was still confused as it makes sense for, say, a rogue who has less strength and no jump modifier to have a tripled jump equal his walking speed, but not when the jump distance exceeds the distance alotted. I.E. if you walk 30ft, you can't jump another 12 according to my understanding of the rules. \$\endgroup\$ – Victor B Nov 28 '20 at 23:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ With your edit, it seems like you know the mechanics bit you're just confirming/asking if it's worth it? \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Dec 6 '20 at 21:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NautArch To be honest, I am asking if it is worth it because I am not sure if either a) I am misunderstanding a variable in my calculation or b) I did not miss anything and one of the two key abilities of a satyr, their ability to leap, actually prevents them from enhancing such an ability through magic and magical items. The second option seems as counterintuitive as True Strike, which is why I am asking for clarification. Seems odd when other racial abilities aren't so limiting. \$\endgroup\$ – Victor B Dec 7 '20 at 5:49
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You've got the mechanics right, but you must move with your feet to long jump

Your assessment of jump distances are correct, which really leaves us with the final scenario question.

No triple jumps in D&D

Each jump is separate, and the movement required for a full long jump is 10' with your feet on the ground (my emphasis):

When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump.

The movement from the first jump is not with your feet on the ground, so it doesn't count for making the long jump no standing. If you want to do a full long jump, you need to use up 10' of your movement with your feet on the ground in that round in order to do so.

The RAW may allow

It's tricky, because what does 'moving on foot' really mean? This isn't a game term and there is some leeway here.

However, I would not allow jumping to be considered moving on foot for the next jump. In this scenario, the Satyr does a standing long jump and lands. Then must do another standing long jump. It doesn't make narrative sense for the second jump in the chain to be longer. Heck, even the field event Triple Jump still involves a run first.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for this detailed answer, but just to make sure I understand; Are you saying that since each standing long jump would be considered its own jump, the satyr could apply mirthful leap to each one? \$\endgroup\$ – Victor B Nov 28 '20 at 23:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ @VictorB Yep! It applies every time you jump. \$\endgroup\$ – NautArch Nov 29 '20 at 0:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ For the intended meaning of "on foot", it may also be useful to look at things like the grung racial trait (whether as a PC or NPC race) "Standing Leap", which says the grung’s "long jump is up to 25 feet and [...] high jump is up to 15 feet, with or without a running start." Even though the jumping rules themselves don't use the words "running start", it seems clear that this is meant to refer to the parts of the jumping rules that require a creature to "move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump" to jump the full distance possible (rather than half that possible distance). \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Nov 29 '20 at 5:03
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You can ‘chain’ jumps

When you make a long jump, you cover a number of feet up to your Strength score if you move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump.

“On foot” is not a defined game turn so it takes its normal English meaning:

If you go somewhere on foot, you walk rather than using any form of transport

So you are “on foot” if you are not mounted, or riding a wagon etc. irrespective of if you are walking, running, skipping or jumping.

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    \$\begingroup\$ For the intended meaning of "on foot", it may be useful to look at things like the grung racial trait (whether as a PC or NPC race) "Standing Leap", which says the grung’s "long jump is up to 25 feet and [...] high jump is up to 15 feet, with or without a running start." Even though the jumping rules themselves don't use the words "running start", it seems clear that this is meant to refer to the parts of the jumping rules that require a creature to "move at least 10 feet on foot immediately before the jump" to jump the full distance possible (rather than half that possible distance). \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Nov 29 '20 at 7:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ Also, treating the words "move [...] on foot" as natural English, I would probably not interpret the particular duration of time when I'm jumping through the air as "moving on foot", any more than falling or being thrown through the air is "moving on foot". (...Also, you should probably find a better definition to quote to support your claim. The definition you've quoted literally says "If you go somewhere on foot, you walk [...]", which seems slightly at odds with your subsequent claim that "you are “on foot” [...] irrespective of if you are walking".) \$\endgroup\$ – V2Blast Nov 29 '20 at 7:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ Dale, this could use clarity on the point of "if you have enough movement remaining, you can make the jump since jumping consumes movement" \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 30 '20 at 15:40

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