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Been playing a wizard in 4e. We are approaching lvl 11, so I have been looking into different PPs (Paragon Paths) and found the Arcane Wayfarer. My question is, does the Teleport 2 from Wayfarer's step add on to your original movement? Or is it just a new movement mode? I.E. Can I teleport 2 then run my full 6 movement right after? Or is it Teleport 2 then run 4?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to the site! Take the tour when you get the time. \$\endgroup\$ – Glazius Feb 5 at 2:04
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It's teleport 2 then walk 4, yes.

When a creature combines movement modes [...] two rules govern the combination.

  • Use Highest Speed: The highest speed among the movement modes used determines the number of squares that the creature can move with the action. Don't add the speeds together.

  • Maximum for Each Movement Mode: The speed of each movement mode determines the maximum number of squares that the creature can move during the segment of the action that movement mode applies to.

-- "Combining Movement Modes", Rules Compendium p. 204

If this was meant to be just "spend your move action to teleport 2 squares" it could be worded just like that. But by this rule, adding teleport 2 as a movement mode means that, for instance, if Kat the Arcane Wayfarer had a base movement speed of 6 squares and no other movement modes before getting the paragon path feature, she can still move 6 squares as a move action but up to 2 of those squares can be a teleport.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It also means that the distance can be increased by various speed increases. Notably, while I imagine the OP was using the term "run" colloquially, if they actually took the Run action (+2 speed in exchange for -5 to hit and granting CA), then they could teleport 4 (2+2) \$\endgroup\$ – Keledrath Feb 9 at 12:12

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