7
\$\begingroup\$

From Xanathar's:

Slayer's Prey Starting at 3rd level, you can focus your ire on one foe, increasing the harm you inflict on it. As a bonus action, you designate one creature you can see within 60 feet of you as the target of this feature. The first time each turn that you hit that target with a weapon attack, it takes an extra 1d6 damage from the weapon.

It says you that the first time each turn that you hit THAT target you deal 1d6, so, that being said, can you:

  • Turn 1: Mark a creature with Slayer Prey
  • Turn 2: Hit the creature with Slayer Prey, gaining the 1d6 bonus damage, designate another creature with Slayers Prey and gain the 1d6 bonus damage again?

My thoughts are: You are hiting the secord creature for the first time in this turn, so this should work, right?

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Not relevant to your main question, but of course you could get a single 1d6 bonus damage on Turn 1 as well, if you attack the market target after your bonus action. \$\endgroup\$
    – user31662
    Feb 19, 2021 at 7:00

2 Answers 2

10
\$\begingroup\$

Slayer's Prey can activate multiple times in one turn, if those activations are against different creatures

First, I'll just note that the scenario you've described works exactly as stated, you can target one creature with Slayer's Prey, attack them on your next turn and then target a new creature with Slayer's Prey and attack them on that same turn.

This is because bonus actions can be used in the middle of actions (or perhaps you're using something other than Extra Attack, which would also work). And because you only have one bonus action per turn, you are correct that you would have to use Slayer's Prey earlier, and wait until the next round to capitalize on this strategy.

Thus, we have Slayer's Prey on a target, we take the Attack action, attacking them and dealing extra damage; we then use Slayer's Prey to mark a new target, and use the other attack of the Attack action from Extra Attack (or some other similar series of events) and deal damage to another creature marked by Slayer's Prey. You have already quoted the relevant part of the feature:

[...] The first time each turn that you hit that target with a weapon attack, it takes an extra 1d6 damage from the weapon. [...]

The restriction of it applying once per turn is also a per target restriction, meaning that having a new target gets around this restriction and allows it to activate more than once per turn. Though at most only twice as you have already used your one and only bonus action for that turn.

\$\endgroup\$
0
2
\$\begingroup\$

It's up to the DM to decide if you can break up your Action to take a Bonus Action.

Slayer's Prey says:

As a bonus action, you designate one creature you can see within 60 feet of you as the target of this feature. The first time each turn that you hit that target with a weapon attack, it takes an extra 1d6 damage from the weapon.

The rules for bonus actions state:

You can take only one bonus action on your turn, so you must choose which bonus action to use when you have more than one available.

So on our first turn, we use our bonus action to designate a target for Slayer's Prey. On our next turn, we attack that target. A 5th level Ranger has the Extra Attack feature, so we have one attack left with our action. This question dives into breaking up your Attack action for a bonus action: Can you break up your Attack action for a bonus action?

The conclusion there is...inconclusive. If the DM permits breaking up your Attack action for a bonus action, then you should be able to use your bonus action on turn 2 to apply Slayer's Prey to a second target, then finish out your Attack action with your second attack. If you DM does not permit breaking up your Attack action like this, then you will not be able to use your bonus action to switch the target of SLayer's Prey until after the Attack action is finished.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Conclusion there seems conclusive enough to me: "you get bonus action X if you do Y" means Y needs to fully happen before X. That's the only restriction. Here, there is no "if" part meaning you can do X whenever. \$\endgroup\$ Feb 19, 2021 at 8:10

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .