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Dyrrn’s Tentacle Whip is from Eberron: Rising from the Last War , pg. 276

The main question is does the tentacle count as a appendage of the player for the purposes of making a melee spell attack.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes for 5th edition, but for my group if there is precedence from earlier editions we usually go with that if there's nothing directly contradicting it in the 5th edition. \$\endgroup\$
    – NRed
    Mar 1 at 18:12
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Dyrrn's Tentacle Whip is a whip, which is a melee weapon.

The Whip appears in the Martial Melee Weapons table of the PHB. Dyrnn's tentacle whip says:

Weapon (whip), very rare (requires attunement)

So Dyrnn's Tentacle Whip is a melee weapon. When attacking with a melee weapon, you make a melee weapon attack, not a melee spell attack.

The Tentacle Whip does not extend your reach for melee spell attacks.

The Reach property of weapons says:

This weapon adds 5 feet to your reach when you attack with it

If you are casting a spell that calls for a melee spell attack, you are not attacking with Dyrnn's Tentacle Whip so the Reach property of the weapon does not apply.

Of course, a DM could rule that it does count, and from a flavor perspective this seems reasonable, but that would make this magic item extremely powerful, far more powerful than it is otherwise.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Does it count as a part of the player due to the symbiotic nature to increase the melee touch range? \$\endgroup\$
    – NRed
    Mar 1 at 18:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ It may be worth noting that tentacle whips had this “deliver touch spell” feature in their original incarnation in Eberron Campaign Setting for 3.5e—but even there, it was a separate, explicit feature of the item, which may make the lack thereof in the 5e version a “conspicuous absence” that lends weight to the idea that we shouldn’t be reading it into the item. \$\endgroup\$
    – KRyan
    Mar 1 at 21:13

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