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Braun is a young Dwarf Barbarian. He uses the Sudden Charge feat to get to the Kobold:

With a quick sprint, you dash up to your foe and swing. Stride twice. If you end your movement within melee reach of at least one enemy, you can make a melee Strike against that enemy.

From what I understood, Braun could move 50ft and attack with a single action. He could then do 2 more attacks with his other 2 actions (for a total of 3 attacks). My table ruled that I could only do 2 total attacks. I don't understand why.

If a Strike is always an action, what's the point of saying "If you end your movement within melee reach of at least one enemy, you can make a melee Strike against that enemy"?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Do you know how to tell how many actions an ability requires? \$\endgroup\$ Mar 8 at 0:53
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    \$\begingroup\$ @indigochild After reading the answer, I googled how to tell that, and now I know :P \$\endgroup\$
    – BlueMoon93
    Mar 8 at 8:27
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Sudden Charge requires two actions and, as part of its activation, allows the user to Stride twice and Strike once. Assuming the user has the standard three actions, they'll have one left after a Sudden Charge, which they can use to Strike again, for a total of two Strikes in their turn.

The advantage of Sudden Charge is that it effectively gives a "free" action - two Strides and one Strike for only two actions.

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