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The maze spell (Player's Handbook, page 258) states:

You banish a creature that you can see within range into a labyrinthine demiplane. The target remains there for the duration or until it escapes the maze.

The target can use its action to attempt to escape. When it does so, it makes a DC 20 Intelligence check. If it succeeds, it escapes, and the spell ends [...]

The banishment spell (Player's Handbook, page 217) states:

You attempt to send one creature that you can see within range to another plane of existence. The target must succeed on a Charisma saving throw or be banished. [...]

[...] If the target is native to a different plane of existence than the one you're on, the target is banished with a faint popping noise, returning to its home plane. If the spell ends before 1 minute has passed, the target reappears in the space it left or in the nearest unoccupied space if that space is occupied. Otherwise, the target doesn't return. [...]

It seems fairly clear-cut, a creature, such as a PC, that can cast banishment is certainly not native to the demiplane created by maze. This is obviously not a way you're intended to escape maze, but have I missed any details in this rules adjudication?

Of course, you might end up in a random place on your home plane, instead of the spot that you occupied when you entered maze, since banishment specifies plane instead of location.

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Yes, you can

You will appear in random place in your home plane.

You might not return to the plane where you meet the caster of maze spell, if that plane is not your home plane.


Your DM might rule that being banished, even for one second, might qualify as 'escape the maze', so the maze spell will end and you don't need to concentrate on banishment. Otherwise, you must concentrate on banishment for 1 minute, or you will be back to the labyrinth plane.

You still need to fail the charisma saving throw to be able to banish yourself. Your DM might rule for automatic fail, or giving disadvantage for being willing.

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