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Feat: Crusher (UA is identical to released content for the following quote.)

Once per turn, when you hit a creature with an attack that deals bludgeoning damage, you can move it 5 feet to an unoccupied space, provided the target is no more than one size larger than you.

This sounds like it was meant for melee, but has no restriction to being melee, so does a bludgeoning ranged weapon like a Sling, Rock, Boulder, etc, with this feat allow you to move a creature towards you via ranged attacks?

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Yes.

Nothing in the feat limits things to melee. Ranged attacks “hit,” and the right ranged weapon, such as the sling you mention, “deals bludgeoning damage,” and so as long as we are talking about a “target [that] is no more than one size larger than you,” you meet all the requirements to trigger Crusher and move the target 5 feet to an unoccupied space.

Ruling that you cannot would be a houserule. Considering how easy it would have been for the authors to write “hit a creature with a melee attack” in the trigger, the fact that they did not seems, to me, to be conspicuous and suggestive that they never meant to limit the feat in that manner. I also see no compelling reason, either for balance or narrative, to implement such a ruling. I could see a DM ruling, for narrative reasons, that a ranged attack can only “push” the target, not pull them closer, though personally I would not.

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Yes.

Nothing in the feat's description limits its action to a melee attack.

Applying "common sense" to the rules can be a dangerous thing if incorrect assumptions are smuggled in unwittingly. There is nothing in the feat that describes how you move your target. It needn't be through direct impact force. A creative DM or player could come up with half a dozen narrative reasons why a sling attack might result in a target both taking damage and ending up five feet from where they were moments ago.

It is important to remember that hit points are not simply an indication of bodily health. Not every event that lowers a creature's hit points requires bodily harm to be inflicted. Here are the two definitions offered in the Player's Handbook.

Your character's hit points define how tough your character is in combat and other dangerous situations. (PHB, 177)

Hit points represent a combination of physical and mental durability, the will to live, and luck. Creatures with more hit points are more difficult to kill. Those with fewer hit points are more fragile. (PHB, 196)

Thus, even an action that involves a bullet being flung from a sling that (mechanically) scored sufficiently high on its attack roll to match or exceed the target's Armour Class might still (narratively) be described as not actually making contact with the target. If, for example, it was such a close call that the target had to take evasive action that lowered its will to live or mental durability, then this is represented (mechanically) by a loss of hit points.

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