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Is there a way in D&D 5e to force a creature to reroll a saving throw they just succeeded on?
I know there are lots of ways to impose disadvantage or other penalties, but I’m specifically looking to make them reroll a successful saving throw. My DM is always very smart with what they do/don’t use legendary resistances on and I’d love a way to get through them faster since we haven’t actually gotten them to use all 3 ever.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Problem. Legendary Resistance doesn't work that way. \$\endgroup\$ – Stop Being Evil Apr 24 at 16:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @StopBeingEvil At that DM's table, it does. 😎 \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Apr 24 at 17:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Axoren I think that would be better suited to an answer. It's going at solving the problem, even if it doesn't stick to the presumed solution of the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Someone_Evil Apr 24 at 21:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Someone_Evil Well, it's deleted now, and I don't remember what I wrote exactly. If someone wants to give that as an answer, it's theirs. \$\endgroup\$ – Axoren Apr 24 at 22:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ A quick aside; the DM shouldn't know what spell they are using Legendary Resistance on, and if they are, they are metagaming. You only know the effects of a spell after it has been cast, and its effects have been generated. If the DM is forcing you to announce your spells, and only using Legendary Resistance on "good" spells, your DM is "cheating." \$\endgroup\$ – Robert Pain VanZant Apr 26 at 22:44
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The first ability that comes to my mind is the Chronurgy Wizard’s 2nd level feature Chronal Shift:

You can magically exert limited control over the flow of time around a creature. As a reaction, after you or a creature you can see within 30 feet of you makes an attack roll, an ability check, or a saving throw, you can force the creature to reroll. You make this decision after you see whether the roll succeeds or fails. The target must use the result of the second roll. You can use this ability twice, and you regain any expended uses when you finish a long rest.

It's a wizard subclass you can find in the Explorer's Guide to Wildemount and it's basically is designed to do exactly what you want to do.

Apart from that... there's one effect of the spell Wish:

You undo a single recent event by forcing a reroll of any roll made within the last round (including your last turn). Reality reshapes itself to accommodate the new result. For example, a wish spell could undo an opponent's successful save, a foe's critical hit, or a friend's failed save. You can force the reroll to be made with advantage or disadvantage, and you can choose whether to use the reroll or the original roll.

But that's like using a sledgehammer for cracking a nut.

But if you want to use an Atom Bomb instead... find a Deck of many Things, don't die or get devoured by an extraplanar force, draw The Fates...

Reality's fabric unravels and spins anew, allowing you to avoid or erase one event as if it never happened. You can use the card's magic as soon as you draw the card or at any other time before you die.

Okay, that's a bit of a joke, because it doesn't enforces a reroll and you probably want to use The Fates to repair some of the damage dealt by the deck. But theoretically you could one-shot-kill any enemy just by telling them that they were never born. But that's pretty much the most powerful effect in the whole game... so wasting it to overcome legendary resistance is... well... not a good idea.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You might be referring to Wish (which is already answered above) but it's only in the last round. I doubt there's something even more powerful than Wish available anywhere. \$\endgroup\$ – Erik Apr 24 at 17:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ “Sledge hammer cracking a nut” is a particularly apt description. \$\endgroup\$ – Thomas Markov Apr 24 at 18:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Erik Yapp, it was Wish... Dang, the Chronurgist is pretty powerful. \$\endgroup\$ – TheKhileyan Apr 24 at 18:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ The Divination Wizard's Portent feature might also apply, as you can replace the succesful roll with a failed one \$\endgroup\$ – divibisan Apr 26 at 22:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ True, but OP asked for forced rerolls on saving throws. Ok, I included The Fates but that was not meant entirely serious. Apart from that: Yes, Portent is quite similar to Chrono Shift \$\endgroup\$ – TheKhileyan Apr 26 at 23:01
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Wish, with gusto!

You undo a single recent event by forcing a reroll of any roll made within the last round (including your last turn). Reality reshapes itself to accommodate the new result. For example, a wish spell could undo an opponent's successful save, a foe's critical hit, or a friend's failed save. You can force the reroll to be made with advantage or disadvantage, and you can choose whether to use the reroll or the original roll.

With wish, you can not only force an opponent to reroll their successful save, you can force it to be rerolled with Disadvantage and choose the worst of all three results as the one they're forced to take.

If you're just trying to melt through Legendary Resistances

Monks are VERY good at eating away through legendary resistances with Stunning Strike, as in a single turn, they can force an opponent to make 3-4 saving throws in a single turn or risk being Stunned. This is available to them as early as Level 5.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Perhaps obvious to everyone already, but this incurs wish stress, so it's not a practical solution for normal situations, especially if it's not fight-ending. But yes, good point that there is a spell for that. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Cordes Apr 25 at 10:22
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Maybe not rerolls but there are other ways to hurt saves

We've already talked about Wish and Chronurgy Wizards in other answers. But there are other ways to hurt enemy saving throws. Some of these are deductions from an enemy save and some are straight disadvantage, essentially the same as forcing a reroll.

Edritch Knight's Eldritch Strike

At 10th level, you learn how to make your weapon strikes undercut a creature’s resistance to your spells. When you hit a creature with a weapon attack, that creature has disadvantage on the next saving throw it makes against a spell you cast before the end of your next turn.

Eloquence Bard's Unsettling Words

You can spin words laced with magic that unsettle a creature and cause it to doubt itself. As a bonus action, you can expend one use of your Bardic Inspiration and choose one creature you can see within 60 feet of you. Roll the Bardic Inspiration die. The creature must subtract the number rolled from the next saving throw it makes before the start of your next turn.

Instrument of the Bards

You can play the instrument while casting a spell that causes any of its targets to be charmed on a failed saving throw, thereby imposing disadvantage on the save. This effect applies only if the spell has a somatic or a material component.

Divination Wizard's Portent

Starting at 2nd level when you choose this school, glimpses of the future begin to press in on your awareness. When you finish a long rest, roll two d20s and record the numbers rolled. You can replace any attack roll, saving throw, or ability check made by you or a creature that you can see with one of these foretelling rolls. You must choose to do so before the roll, and you can replace a roll in this way only once per turn.

Arcane Trickster's Magical Ambush

Starting at 9th level, if you are hidden from a creature when you cast a spell on it, the creature has disadvantage on any saving throw it makes against the spell this turn.

Light Domain Cleric's Corona of Light

Starting at 17th level, you can use your action to activate an aura of sunlight that lasts for 1 minute or until you dismiss it using another action. You emit bright light in a 60-foot radius and dim light 30 feet beyond that. Your enemies in the bright light have disadvantage on saving throws against any spell that deals fire or radiant damage.

Circle of Stars Druid Cosmic Omen

Woe (odd). Whenever a creature you can see within 30 feet of you is about to make an attack roll, a saving throw, or an ability check, you can use your reaction to roll a d6 and subtract the number rolled from the total.

20th level Oath of the Ancients Paladin's Elder Champion

Enemy creatures within 10 feet of you have disadvantage on saving throws against your paladin spells and Channel Divinity options.

Any Sorcerer's Heightened Spell

When you cast a spell that forces a creature to make a saving throw to resist its effects, you can spend 3 sorcery points to give one target of the spell disadvantage on its first saving throw made against the spell.

Shadow Magic Sorcerer's Hound of Ill Omen

Additionally, while the hound is within 5 feet of the target, the target has disadvantage on saving throws against any spell you cast.

Wild Magic Sorcerer's Bend Luck

Starting at 6th level, you have the ability to twist fate using your > wild magic. When another creature you can see makes an attack roll, an > ability check, or a saving throw, you can use your reaction and spend > 2 sorcery points to roll 1d4 and apply the number rolled as a bonus or > penalty (your choice) to the creature’s roll. You can do so after the > creature rolls but before any effects of the roll occur.


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