5
\$\begingroup\$

I play a bard and my party wants me to learn the spell Leomund's Tiny Hut (or Tiny Hut for those without the full access to D&D Beyond). That spell is tagged as ritual, and before agreeing to take that spell, I want to be sure of the way of using it.

As a DM, I've never used rituals and I've never disallowed my players to cast rituals, also I never was under the impression they cheated about it. However, here in the game where I play a bard, the DM plays exclusively by the rules. So I better get my stuff straight.

The Bard's spellcasting ability says:

You can cast any bard spell you know as a ritual if that spell has the ritual tag.

So that means I can cast Leomund's Tiny Hut as a ritual since it's tagged with ritual.

The whole rule about rituals is the following:

Certain spells have a special tag: ritual. Such a spell can be cast following the normal rules for spellcasting, or the spell can be cast as a ritual. The ritual version of a spell takes 10 minutes longer to cast than normal. It also doesn't expend a spell slot, which means the ritual version of a spell can't be cast at a higher level.

To cast a spell as a ritual, a spellcaster must have a feature that grants the ability to do so. The cleric and the druid, for example, have such a feature. The caster must also have the spell prepared or on his or her list of spells known, unless the character's ritual feature specifies otherwise, as the wizard's does.

If I understand well, I have two possibilities to cast Leomund's Tiny Hut as a ritual: either spend 10 minutes and 6 seconds, or spend 6 seconds and a spell slot, correct?

If I cast the spell as a ritual, I don't expend a spell slot, but does that mean that I'm not required to have a free spell slot? In other words, if I've used all my level 3+ spell slots, can I still cast it as a ritual?

Conversely, if I want to cast it ASAP, can I cast it with a level 4+ spell slot? The sentence "the ritual version of a spell can't be cast at a higher level" makes me doubt...

Finally, can I voluntarily interrupt my ritual casting? If the situation becomes dangerous or otherwise?

\$\endgroup\$
8
\$\begingroup\$

You said, "If I understand well, I have two possibilities to cast Leomund's Tiny Hut as a ritual: either spend 10 minutes and 6 seconds, or spend 6 seconds and a spell slot, correct?"

Not exactly. First, Tiny hut has a casting time of 1 minute normally, not six seconds, and you spend a spell slot of level 3 or higher. (No point to using a higher slot, though -- tiny hut gives you no benefit for "upcasting".)

When you declare you're doing it as a ritual, you instead spend no spell slot, and add ten minutes to the casting time.

So you have two options: You can cast the spell normally, spending 1 minute and a spell slot, or you can cast the spell as a ritual, which makes it take 11 minutes and no spell slot.

You don't even need a spell slot open to cast a ritual. You can ritualize all day even after you've expended all your spell slots. For that matter, look at the Ritual Caster feat -- you can take that and cast rituals when you don't even have a Spellcasting class feature, and no spell slots at all!

Since doing the spell as a ritual actually increases the casting time, it does make you vulnerable to interruption, the same as any spell with a long (i.e. longer than 1 action) casting time. You can always choose to stop casting a spell before it's complete:

When you cast a spell with a casting time longer than a single action or reaction, you must spend your action each turn casting the spell, and you must maintain your concentration while you do so. If your concentration is broken, the spell fails, but you don't expend a spell slot. If you want to try casting the spell again, you must start over.

You can always decide not to spend your action casting the spell or intentionally end your concentration on it -- you aren't locked into spell casting mode until it's complete or disrupted by an outside influence. This is "must" in the sense of "you must do this if you want to make the spell work", not "you have no option to do otherwise".

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ You might want to upcast if you need it faster and have no 3rd level slots, or to give dispel magic a chance to fail to dispel your hut. Just because the spell doesn't offer a benefit doesn't mean there's no point to upcasting. It is highly situational though, and not particularly relevant to the question. \$\endgroup\$ – InternetHobo May 1 at 6:47
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I thought of that, but I didn't want to junk up my answer with a side-comment to my side-comment to explain all the possible weird corner cases where upcasting might still occur despite the spell having no innate benefit for it. \$\endgroup\$ – Darth Pseudonym May 2 at 16:51
12
\$\begingroup\$

Tiny hut has a casting time of 1 minute, 11 minutes as a ritual.

Casting Time: 1 Minute.

So, to cast tiny hut as a ritual, it takes 11 minutes total, and when you do so, it does not consume a spell slot, and you do not need a spell slot:

The ritual version of a spell takes 10 minutes longer to cast than normal. It also doesn't expend a spell slot

Without casting as a ritual, it takes 1 minute and consumes a spell slot of 3rd level or higher (your choice).

You can interrupt your own casting at any time. Spells with long casting times require you to maintain concentration:

you must maintain your concentration while you do so.

And you can end concentration at any time:

You can end concentration at any time (no action required).

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Oh, my bad about 1 action/1 minute. But yes, the idea is there. Also, what about interruptions and spell slots above 3rd? \$\endgroup\$ – Olivier Grégoire Apr 30 at 13:00
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Maybe just use the following: "When a character casts a spell, he or she expends a slot of that spell's level or higher, effectively "filling" a slot with the spell." and explicitly state that "the ritual version of a spell can't be cast at a higher level." only applies to the ritual version, in other words, only applies when it is being cast as a ritual \$\endgroup\$ – Medix2 Apr 30 at 13:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ @OlivierGrégoire An interruption that stops you would be the same as you choosing to stop voluntarily. The restriction of "the ritual version of the spell can't be cast at a higher level" applies to the spell only when cast as a ritual. \$\endgroup\$ – RevanantBacon Apr 30 at 13:34

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.