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I regularly see the text of Twinned Spell cited as:

When you cast a spell that targets only one creature and doesn’t have a range of self, you can spend a number of sorcery points equal to the spell’s level to target a second creature in range with the same spell (1 sorcery point if the spell is a cantrip).

To be eligible, a spell must be incapable of targeting more than one creature at the spell’s current level. For example, Magic Missile and Scorching Ray aren’t eligible, but Ray of Frost is.

But in my copy of the Player's Handbook, the second paragraph isn't there:

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I haven't been able to find an erratum about this, but I'm also not super-familiar with the sources of errata. Where does the language in the generally quoted second paragraph come from?

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I found it by reading the accepted answer to this question; it's from the Player's Handbook errata:

Twinned Spell (p. 102). A new paragraph appears at the end of this subsection: “To be eligible, a spell must be incapable of targeting more than one creature at the spell’s current level. For example, magic missile and scorching ray aren’t eligible, but ray of frost and chromatic orb are.”

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    \$\begingroup\$ Glad you found your answer Joel, Wizards isn't really great at making their errata accessible. Leaving an answer here is fine, but it needs to answer the question clearly. If you don't mind, just edit in the information that answers your question here. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 4 '21 at 16:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ThomasMarkov Thanks so much—I've edited my answer. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 4 '21 at 18:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ I've added the quote from the errata and trimmed the answer a bit; this is a helpful Q&A, I've had players at the table before with older PHBs wondering why I was making a ruling about Twinned Spell. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 4 '21 at 18:48
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    \$\begingroup\$ Perhaps worth noting that later printings of the Player’s Handbook also include this text. \$\endgroup\$ Nov 4 '21 at 21:49

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