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The description of the Disintegrate spell reads:

You fire a green ray at your target. Make a spell attack. You deal 12d10 damage, and the target must attempt a basic Fortitude save.

What type of damage is this considered?

The CRB, as far as I can tell, makes no mention of untyped damage. There are untyped penalties and bonuses to checks, but all damage appears to have a type. In fact, determining the damage type is considered a critical step in dealing damage:

Step 2: Determine the Damage Type

Once you’ve calculated how much damage you deal, you’ll need to determine the damage type.

One might assume that this spell deals force damage, as it does in D&D 5th edition. The CRB even specifies that "powerful and pure magical energy can manifest itself as force damage", but other spells that deal force damage such as Magic Missile and Blade Barrier specify that they deal force damage.

So is the Disintegrate spell the sole example of untyped damage in Pathfinder 2e? Or is there a precedent somewhere for untyped damage that I haven't seen?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Green damage, obviously. (I kid, this is a great question, you’ve done some research and explained what you found). \$\endgroup\$ Apr 21, 2022 at 0:04
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    \$\begingroup\$ thanks! it's also an interesting question for how it interacts with stuff like the resistances of a ghost or wraith, who resist "all but force, ghost touch, or positive" - so Disintegrate being untyped would seem to mean it gets reduced by that resistance, whereas a Magic Missile wouldn't. \$\endgroup\$
    – user23801
    Apr 21, 2022 at 0:08

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Typeless Damage

Nothing in Pathfinder 2e puts the damage dealt by disintegrate as force damage, or as any other type of damage. This lack of damage type is repeated across a few spells, including implosion and power word kill, so it doesn't seem to be in error despite not being explicitly described in the list of damage types.

Damage without type would bypass most resistances, as they typically specify a subset of damage types like 'fire' or 'piercing' that typeless damage lacks. As you've mentioned however, an incorporeal creature's resistance to all damage would still apply normally, as typeless damage is still damage.

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