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Nature's Mantle allows you to use the Hide action if you are lightly obscured.

While you are in an area that is lightly obscured, you can Hide as a bonus action even if you are being directly observed.

Pass Without Trace says shadows and silence radiates from you.

A veil of shadows and silence radiates from you, masking you and your companions from detection.

Now Dim Light is called Shadows.

Dim light, also called shadows, creates a lightly obscured area.

So if shadows are created from the "Pass Without Trace" spell, would this be considered under the effect of Dim Light/Lightly Obscured for the purpose of Hiding with Nature's Mantle?

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When spells create dim light, they say so; pass without trace does not change lighting

The shadow of moil spell states:

[...] The shadows turn dim light within 10 feet of you into darkness, and bright light in the same area to dim light. [...]

Meanwhile, pass without trace states:

A veil of shadows and silence radiates from you, masking you and your companions from detection. For the duration, each creature you choose within 30 feet of you (including you) has a +10 bonus to Dexterity (Stealth) checks and can't be tracked except by magical means. A creature that receives this bonus leaves behind no tracks or other traces of its passage. [...]

While the first sentence isn't strictly fluff, the mechanical benefits of that are listed in the later parts of the spell. The "veil of shadows" does not mention actually turning bright light into dim light and so it does not do this.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I guess fluff-wise, a moving 30' circle of dim light could be very obvious to see from a distance, countering the intended effect. So in pass without trace it may help imagine the pass without trace visual as shape-breaking camoflage effects, too subtle to be considered "areas of dim light". \$\endgroup\$ Apr 23 at 20:04

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