3
\$\begingroup\$

The Scar Seeker prestige class includes a feature (Enduring Scar - Mercy) which allows a Paladin to add a Mercy to a casting of Lay on Hands which they do not have but "for which he qualifies". I find it a bit confusing that they did not use the term "for which he meets the prerequisites", which is more in-line with the rest of the rules.

In my mind, there's two possible readings of this:

  1. The Paladin is able to expend a daily usage of the Enduring Scar class ability to add any mercy for which they have the required level, since they technically "qualify" to cast it.

  2. The Paladin is able to expend a daily usage of the Enduring Scar class ability to add any mercy for which they have the required level as well as any prerequisite mercies. This seems slightly more in line with the wording, but it would also encourage picking all other mercies with the sole intent to unlock as many as possible, which seems undesirable.

Is there any rules or errata that explain the exact meaning of the word "qualifies" in this context? Thank you for any pointers or opinions.

Context: This came up in a campaign I'm GMing where the Paladin is pondering to pick the above class feature.

\$\endgroup\$

1 Answer 1

2
\$\begingroup\$

The second option you presented is correct.

The scar seeker needs all the requirements to able to pick the mercy to use it. I was unable to find any official rulings or errata to directly support either option. but this really boils down to the definition of "qualify"

Sadly, Pathfinder never gives a direct definition of "qualify". But in this context "qualifying for x" means "having the prerequisites for x". A quick google search for the definition supports this.

Qualify definition

I also think that the second option is more in line with that the author of the prestige class intended.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the response. It's weird that they chose the different wording here. \$\endgroup\$
    – Mookuh
    Commented Jun 27, 2022 at 15:41

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .