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Wild Shape specifies that:

You automatically revert if you fall unconscious, drop to 0 hit points, or die.

and

When you transform, you assume the beast’s hit points and Hit Dice. When you revert to your normal form, you return to the number of hit points you had before you transformed. However, if you revert as a result of dropping to 0 hit points, any excess damage carries over to your normal form. For example, if you take 10 damage in animal form and have only 1 hit point left, you revert and take 9 damage. As long as the excess damage doesn’t reduce your normal form to 0 hit points, you aren’t knocked unconscious.

Blackrazor specifies that:

Whenever you use it to reduce a creature to 0 hit points, the sword slays the creature and devours its soul, unless it is a construct or an undead. A creature whose soul has been devoured by Blackrazor can be restored to life only by a wish spell.

Blackrazor states that it slays the creature when it reduces it to 0 hit points, which is similar to the wording Disintegrate used to have (and old Disintegrate used to kill Wild shapers): "If this damage reduces the target to 0 hit points, it is disintegrated" vs. "Whenever you use it to reduce a creature to 0 hit points, the sword slays the creature and devours its soul". This hasn't gotten errata'd though, so am I correct by RAW in assuming that Blackrazor still sucks the soul if the animal form gets dropped to 0 HP?

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The druid leaves beast form, then their soul gets sucked out

As explained in the Q&A linked in the question, the ruling in Sage Advice Compendium how effects that snuff you out when you hit 0 and wild shape interact has been reversed:

What happens if a druid using Wild Shape is reduced to 0 hit points by disintegrate? Does the druid simply leave beast form? The druid leaves beast form. As usual any leftover damage then applies to the druid’s normal hit points. If the leftover damage leaves the druid with 0 hit points, the druid is disintegrated.

The last sentence shows that the effect is not lost, it still applies to the creature, and is waiting to be resolved next. But if the creature now is not left at 0 any more, it does nothing.

I think the ruling for disintegrate makes it clear that the intention is for wild shape as a special case to always beat the normal rules of resolution order for simultaneous effects. (Without that ruling, the DM would need to decide the order of effects, or if you used the rules from Xanathar, the person that controls the current creature's turn.)

The wording between this and Disintegrate however differs. Disintegrate says:

The target is disintegrated if this damage leaves it with 0 hit points

Here the requirement is different:

Whenever you use it to reduce a creature to 0 hit points

The creature was reduced to 0 even if it has not been left with 0. The effect still is waiting to now be resolved, and since the soul gets sucked out of the creature if the sword did reduce it to 0 -and it did - its soul gets sucked out.

The wording of Wild Shape (p 66 PHB) is:

You automatically revert if you fall unconscious, drop to 0 hit points, or die.

Reverting is not a replacement for dropping to 0. It does not say "If damage would reduce you to 0, instead you revert". You actually first drop to 0, and then revert.

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