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(...) A ward against magic creates an immobile, faintly shimmering magical sphere (with radius 10 feet) that surrounds the caster and excludes all spell effects of up to 1st level. Alternatively, the caster can ward just the target and not create the radius effect. For each additional level of spells to be excluded, increase the Spellcraft DC by +20 (but see below). The area or effect of any such spells does not include the area of the ward, and such spells fail to affect any target within the ward. This includes spell-like abilities and spells or spell-like effects from magic items. However, any type of spell can be cast through or out of the ward. The caster can leave and return to the protected area without penalty (unless the spell specifically targets a creature and does not provide a radius effect). (...)

Based on this section of the Ward seed in the Epic Level Handbook, would a ward limited to a single target disappear as soon as the target moved? Or could they move around while retaining the benefit?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Answers are to limit themselves exclusively to this section of the description of the Ward seed? That is, answers are to ignore examples epic spells like epic repulsion and other epic spells that use the Ward seed? \$\endgroup\$ Jan 15, 2023 at 4:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would have happily accepted example spells as proof of either side. Thank you for pointing this out. \$\endgroup\$ Jan 15, 2023 at 13:01

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The ward moves with a single creature

The wording of the ward seed section is somewhat ambiguous because the sentence about the sphere effect states it is immobile

A ward against magic creates an immobile, faintly shimmering magical sphere (with radius 10 feet) that surrounds the caster and excludes all spell effects of up to 1st level. Alternatively, the caster can ward just the target and not create the radius effect.

It is not 100% clear from the wording if the alternative of warding only the target would also be immobile, although I think a reading where it isn't makes more sense: the alternative states it does not create the radius effect, and it is the radius effect that is described as immobile.

In addition, there is further support that only the sphere is immobile from the example spells that make use of the seed. One of these is the Eternal Freedom spell, which has this effect:

The subject becomes permanently immune to the following specific spells, effects, and spell-like abilities: entangle, hold, imprisonment, paralysis, petrification, sleep, slow, stunning, temporal stasis, and web. This is a ritual spell requiring ten other spellcasters, each of whom must contribute an unused 9th-level spell slot to the casting

Permanent immunity would not make sense if tied to immobility. You would not go through all this cost and effort, and then be fixed to a single spot for the rest of your life. Moreover, it would not make sense to include costs for effects like web here whose whole objective is to stop you from moving, if you could not usefully move to begin with once warded.

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