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The Elven Accuracy feat says:

"Whenever you have advantage on an attack roll using Dexterity, Intelligence, Wisdom, or Charisma, you can reroll one of the dice once."

Assuming you meet the requirements for using the feat, are you obligated to take the result of the reroll? Or can you just choose from the results of the original rolls and the Elven Accuracy roll?

I am trying to figure out if there would ever be any reason NOT to make a reroll and use the feat.

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3 Answers 3

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Reroll means re-roll: You roll the die again, whatever old value it had is gone and the new value is the new value. If it meant "roll another die and pick whichever you want", it would say that, much like the Lucky feat. You're "obligated to take the result of the reroll" only in the sense that the new roll becomes one of the two values that your Advantage is considering.

So if you made an attack with advantage and rolled a 10 and a 14, you would (normally) select the 10 to reroll with your Elven Accuracy. Suppose you get a 16 — now you have a 16 and a 14, and your attack uses the 16. If your reroll had been a 7, you'd have a 7 and a 14, and you'd use the 14, same as if you hadn't had Elven Accuracy at all. You aren't obligated to use the 7, but it does become one of the two values Advantage is choosing from.

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    \$\begingroup\$ You might compare with Halfling Lucky, which says you must use the new result. As you say, must is not used here, because the player still has the choice of the other roll with advantage. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kirt
    Apr 19, 2023 at 4:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ It could also be compared to the 'Great Weapon' fighting style, because if you roll a 1 or 2, you must use the new result, regardless if it is a 1 or 2. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 19, 2023 at 16:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ It may be worth noting that Elven Accuracy doesn't require you to reroll one of the dice in the first place; it says you "can reroll", not that you must. Beyond that, your answer is correct. \$\endgroup\$
    – V2Blast
    Apr 19, 2023 at 19:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ And note that it's perfectly fine to shortcut Elven Accuracy by just rolling 3 dice and picking the highest. The result is the same. \$\endgroup\$
    – Jorn
    Apr 20, 2023 at 15:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Jorn Provided you're in the normal case where you want your roll to be as high as possible, it's the same as rolling 3 and picking highest. In theory, you could choose your higher roll to discard and reroll, though why you would do that is unclear. Maybe if there were a reason you were trying to avoid dealing a critical hit, or avoid rolling an even number, or some other strange corner case. \$\endgroup\$ Apr 20, 2023 at 20:31
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As mentioned in the other answer, your re-roll overwrites the (one) die you re-rolled, but since you can pick the lower die to re-roll, there is never a reason not to do it - you will get at least the value the other die shows. Because of it, Elven Accuracy is commonly treated in practice as "roll 3, pick highest" as it's functionally the same*.

* There is one exception to this however - if, for some reason, you aim to miss (pun intended) while having advantage. In that case, you could re-roll the higher die, so it would no longer be the same as "roll 3, pick highest".

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    \$\begingroup\$ Usually if you aim to "miss" at doing something, you wouldn't need a roll at all. Or you'd roll for something else entirely, for instance to convince observers that you tried your best, while deliberately failing. But that might be a discussion worth a separate question. \$\endgroup\$
    – Matthieu
    Apr 19, 2023 at 9:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ It shouldn't be hard to imagine a scenario where such a thing might come up - for example, someone magically forces you to attack your ally, but you are under no obligation to make that attack effective. \$\endgroup\$
    – matszwecja
    Apr 19, 2023 at 10:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ While this is theorically a correct scenario, this also is very much metagaming, which brings more issues to the table, such as whether or not you can "pull your punches" when compelled to attack an ally, or whether or not being better at hitting foes also makes you better at not hitting someone you attack. \$\endgroup\$
    – Matthieu
    Apr 19, 2023 at 11:36
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    \$\begingroup\$ The best kind of correct. \$\endgroup\$
    – matszwecja
    Apr 19, 2023 at 12:20
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    \$\begingroup\$ Best kind of correct is "technically correct", not "theoretically correct". \$\endgroup\$
    – Shadomew
    Apr 19, 2023 at 12:28
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When using elven accuracy, do you have to take the results of the reroll?

Yeah, that's what reroll means.

Assuming you meet the requirements for using the feat, are you obligated to take the result of the reroll? Or can you just choose from the results of the original rolls and the Elven Accuracy roll?

It's not a matter of obligation, it's just simply what reroll means. This is different from Advantage because in those circumstances you roll 2 dice and keep the highest result. A reroll means the roll replaces it.

However, it's important to note, although the feat text doesn't specify which die, it would clearly be beneficial to reroll the lower of the two advantage rolls, so your end result is the better of the higher advantage die and the re-roll. If you reroll the higher die, you lose that option and could potentially have an end result that is lower than the highest of the two advantage dice.

Any automated tool, like dndbeyond, roll20, or whatever that has an Elven Accuracy feature always implements it as the best of three 20-sided die rolls, which is what it is if you reroll the lower advantage die.

I am trying to figure out if there would ever be any reason NOT to make a reroll and use the feat.

By definition, if you are using the feat, you are re-rolling. If the question were

Is there any reason not to use the feat?

or

Is there any reason to re-roll the higher roll?

Kind of scratching my head here, but I cannot think of a situation where you would decide to attack with advantage, but do not want to hit. That would be the only conceivable situation where you would not apply the benefit of your feat, or perhaps apply it to re-roll the higher roll in the hopes it would be lower. You could certainly gain information that might change your mind about whether an NPC is an enemy or not, but seems highly unlikely to occur after the choice to attack has been made, but before the outcome is determined.

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