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By "temporarily living" I mean "temporarily lose undead type and all features that come with that"?

Exact use case: I want to be able to use Blood Money with my undead PC.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I presume your tagging is accurate and that this will not help, but just in case that assumption is wrong, are you able to port 3.5e material? I know a way to do it in that system. \$\endgroup\$
    – KRyan
    Commented May 7 at 20:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Unfortunately no chance. We play Pathfinder 1 specifically. In fact in 3.5 I would do it the other way around: be alive and use "get all undead features" buff with Permanency. Sadly, no such options in Pathfinder 1. \$\endgroup\$
    – Nec Xelos
    Commented May 8 at 4:00

3 Answers 3

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Blush of Youth

This occult ritual temporarily returns an undead creature to its previous creature type for the duration of this spell:

If the caster is undead, she returns to her previous creature type (before dying and becoming undead) for the ritual’s duration, treating her Constitution score as being equal to her Charisma score when necessary. She counts as a living creature of her previous type, but she retains the immunities granted by the undead type as well as any special abilities granted by her particular type of undead, unless those abilities rely on appearing undead or on physical features her young living body doesn’t have (for instance, she would lose horrific appearance or claw attacks gained by becoming undead, but not a lich’s paralyzing touch).

This should work, as you have a living body again, including blood.

However, it's up to your GM to rule on whether you retain an undead's immunity to physical ability score damage: Blood Money doesn't work on those immune to Strength damage. But this undead immunity is most likely tied to the physical features of undead (no muscles or sinews on a skeleton), so it would be reversed by the ritual as well.

The spell has the [evil] descriptor, as it (usually) requires the sacrifice of children of the caster's race:

Components V, S, M (a fist-sized onyx worth at least 5,000 gp, one creature of younger than adult age of the same race as the primary caster per level of the primary caster), SC (see text)

However, as these sacrifices are listed as material component without a specific price, you can avoid sacrificing children with the Eschew Materials feat or a similar ability that negates the need for unexpensive material components. A spell component pouch is insufficient in this case, as the children are unlikely to fit inside (unless you are a really tiny race).

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    \$\begingroup\$ Eschew Materials refers to spells – not to rituals, so it’s not quite clear if can use the feat at all. Furthermore (and putting aside the question of whether a child is worth 1 gp or less and could be ignored as a component), this ritual is a strict ceremony with a detailed description of what you have to do and what happens during the seven hours casting time. All the components play their part and thus can't be omitted. At least I cannot imagine any GM consider the description of the ritual process as just being fluff... \$\endgroup\$
    – Peregrin
    Commented May 8 at 18:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Peregrin: The Occult Ritual rules specify that these rituals are a special form of spellcasting, next to arcane, divine, and psychic. This includes being subject to spell resistance, how to calculate caster level, belonging to a magic school, and most obviously: (material) components. This particular ritual is a 7th-level necromancy spell with the [evil] descriptor, as well as verbal, somatic, and material components. All of these things are only defined for spells. \$\endgroup\$
    – Theaitetos
    Commented May 8 at 20:53
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A wish spell (or similar reality altering magic) might do the trick.

Its easy to lose the undead type with the various raise dead spells, but those have the unfortunate side effect of being permanent (or at least until a very confused grim reaper pays you yet another visit).

I noticed that you tagged this question with a pathfinder tag. There is a PF spell called Temporary Resurrection that will raise a person from the dead for 24 hours before dying again.

That's all I have.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I can see this spells work on the dead, where do you get from they also work on the undead? Maybe when you kill the PC first, so they are actually dead? Cute logo, BTW. \$\endgroup\$ Commented May 7 at 18:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ The evidence that they work on undead is uneven at best but scattereed over dozens of monster descriptions and editions. Over the years, the game designers have included rules on occasion suggesting that casting spells such as raise dead on some undead monsters will 'kill them', presumably because you are bringing them back to life? This would probably preculde any real use for an undead character, unless the player was just sick of being undead. \$\endgroup\$
    – Roger Hill
    Commented May 8 at 0:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @NobodytheHobgoblin is right: Resurrection spells do not work on undead, unless the caster is an Undead bloodline Sorcerer. There is an offensive spell that can transform you into a humanoid, Baleful Shadow Transmutation, but that spell also removes your ability to cast spells. It would only be useful if you had an ability to expend spell-slots for your desired spells without casting a spell. \$\endgroup\$
    – Theaitetos
    Commented May 8 at 10:28
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I just realised that I should be able to fulfill my conditions with Possession family of spells, including Magic Jar.

https://www.aonprd.com/SpellDisplay.aspx?ItemName=possession

All it takes is a strong living body (preferably with a lot of STR to utilize) and Blood Money works perfectly, since Mental Ability Scores, spellcasting and all class & mental abilities do carry over to host's body.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Good idea… but: For Blood Money you must use your own body’s blood. When you cut one of "your" hands while occupying another body you only get blood from your host body ... \$\endgroup\$
    – Peregrin
    Commented May 9 at 7:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does it say anywhere it has to be my original body's blood? As long as I occupy a host his body it is mine so that sounds like nitpicking on a figure of speech. Is there any precedent, RAW, that makes such distinction in the rules? \$\endgroup\$
    – Nec Xelos
    Commented May 9 at 14:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ If it were just about blood, then Alter Self would work too. Possession might work, but is subject to the same caveat as polymorph spells and Blush of Youth: Your undead type's immunity to Strength damage. I think Blush of Youth is more "robust" in this regard as it specifically changes creature type and calls out those immunities. p.s.: A strong living body is not an issue, due to Muscle Grout. \$\endgroup\$
    – Theaitetos
    Commented May 9 at 22:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please specify what do you mean. If host body isn't of undead type it's not immune to ability damage, nor does it say "soul" is carrying over the type to new body. And Alter Self in PF1.0 as opposed to D&D 3.5 does not change the type, it's pretty much just a glorified buff. All polymorphs in PF1.0 has been nerfed to the ground, pretty much useless. \$\endgroup\$
    – Nec Xelos
    Commented May 10 at 2:30
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    \$\begingroup\$ Possession can carry over supernatural abilities that are not tied to physical form. The undead immunities are supernatural (or extraordinary) abilities. Consider this: Would a lich possessing a human lose his immunity to mind-affecting effects? Probably not, because that immunity is a supernatural ability that carries over into the host body. \$\endgroup\$
    – Theaitetos
    Commented May 10 at 3:52

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