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Okay so, the effects of Time Stop:

You briefly stop the flow of time for everyone but yourself. No time passes for other creatures, while you take 1d4 + 1 turns in a row, during which you can use actions and move as normal.

This spell ends if one of the actions you use during this period, or any effects that you create during this period, affects a creature other than you or an object being worn or carried by someone other than you. In addition, the spell ends if you move to a place more than 1,000 feet from the location where you cast it.

The RAW for what counts as a magical effect is meeting any of the following criteria:

Is it a magic item?

Is it a spell? Or does it let you create the effects of a spell that’s mentioned in its description?

Is it a spell attack?

Is it fueled by the use of spell slots?

Does its description say it’s magical?

Antimagic Field prevents the following (among other things):

Spells and other magical effects, except those created by an artifact or a deity, are suppressed in the sphere and can't protrude into it. A slot expended to cast a suppressed spell is consumed. While an effect is suppressed, it doesn't function, but the time it spends suppressed counts against its duration.

Spells. Any active spell or other magical effect on a creature or an object in the sphere is suppressed while the creature or object is in it.

Time Stop is not a concentration spell, nor is the effect of being frozen something that is "on" you, even though it's range is self. Since summoned creatures, for example, only disappear when THEY are in the field, but not when the caster is, it implies that persistent magical effects outside an Antimagic Field created by someone who then enters an Antimagic Field would function as normal. Nor does the Antimagic Field actually end spells at all anyway, it merely suppresses them. So my question is two-fold:

A) Since the condition for ending the spell is part of the spell, does that mean it counts as a magical effect?

And if it does -

B) Does that mean that since that effect IS on the caster of Time Stop, that while they are within an Antimagic Field and Time Stop is active, they could make ranged attacks or otherwise interact with frozen people outside of the field? The wording of the end effect does not say "when a creature is affected" but rather "when you affect a creature", which means the trigger for ending is sourced not with the recipient but the do-er (like the difference between "when you hit/target with an attack" and "when a creature takes damage"). Therefore if the end effect does count as magical, then is it possible it would not apply within the Antimagic Field, allowing the caster to (for example) shoot someone outside it with a cannon?

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Motivated reasoning says no

Both time stop and antimagic field are difficult, complicated spells to adjudicate. I would love to see a graph of the number of questions here on RPG Stacks for every 5e spell; I would wager that both of these are on the high end of the distribution. If you have a question about how two such spells interact when both of them are already themselves complicated, you have to be prepared for there to not be a clear RAW answer.

However, permitting a caster to have extra turns and to be able to affect others on those turns is clearly unbalanced. In any game where combat is important, finding an exploit that permitted a PC to be able to attack while under the effects of time stop would quickly degenerate into 'whoever casts time stop first, wins'. Regardless of what the RAW answer is here, the conclusion has to be that this is not permitted.

So what remains is to figure out why this is not permitted, and that is an interesting exercise that helps illuminate how you want your world to work.

Option A - Antimagic field ends time stop on the caster

Have a look at Can a creature take turns as normal if they are inside an Antimagic Field while another creature casts Time Stop? The vast preponderance of votes there are that time stop ends on the caster as soon as the caster enters the antimagic field, and remains suppressed for the length of time the caster is in the AMF - basically your caster would be squandering their time stop turns by spending them inside an AMF. However, they could resume the effects of time stop for the remaining duration by leaving the AMF.

I have to say, I was surprised at the results of the linked question. For as much as we here on RPG Stacks like to say "spells do what they say they do", most people on that question agree that "when time stop says that 'You briefly stop the flow of time for everyone but yourself' what it really means is that 'you yourself step out of time', and when it says 'No time passes for other creatures', what it really means is 'you are super sped up allowing you to do more things'. That is, instead of time stop affecting everyone but you like it says, it actually affects only you. In a comment, Shivers says that this is how the spell worked in 3.5. I agree that it is more plausible and easier to adjudicate; my only problem with it is that is not what the 5e spell text actually says.

Option B - Antimagic field ends time stop for everyone by making the caster unlocatable

If you don't want to rule that time stop affects only you, if you are so committed to 'spells do what they say they do' that you are willing to hold to that principle even when it gets uncomfortable, then the spell affects everyone but you. So wouldn't the spell persist even if the caster entered the antimagic field? As OP on this question argues, "persistent magical effects outside an Antimagic Field created by someone who then enters an Antimagic Field would function as normal." I agree that the spell effects would persist when the caster entered an AMF - except for the fact that their doing so would trigger an end condition for the spell itself.

The spell says that:

the spell ends if you move to a place more than 1,000 feet from the location where you cast it.

This means that while the spell is running, it has to continually track the location of the caster, and their current distance from the point of casting. That is one of the (magical) effects of the spell. If the caster entered an AMF, this magical effect would be suppressed on them - they would, in effect, become untraceable to their own spell. And once their own spell could not 'find' them, it would treat them as if they had moved out of range (just as if they had not moved a physical distance but had, say, cast plane shift). Thus, once the spell calculated that the caster was not within 1000 feet, it would end the entire spell.

With this reasoning, as soon as the caster entered the AMF, the time stop would end - not because its effects would be suppressed on only the caster, but because it would trigger an end condition and stop the spell effects on everyone else. With the spell itself ended, the effects would not resume once the caster left the AMF.

Whatever your preferred reasoning, the effects of the spell end for at least as long as the caster remains in the AMF, and possibly permanently.

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    \$\begingroup\$ As a note, option B is how it worked in 3.5e: "This spell seems to make time cease to flow for everyone but you. In fact, you speed up so greatly that all other creatures seem frozen, though they are actually still moving at their normal speeds." The alternative, that you truly stop time for the entire universe, feels well beyond the scope of even a 9th level spell. \$\endgroup\$
    – Shivers
    Commented Jun 15 at 2:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ +1 I think you have the most important consideration: RAW does not matter, if following it would destroy the game. This motivates finding a credible reading that says no, and if that is not possible, ignore the rule. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jun 15 at 5:19
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Shivers That is actually Option A. I put my commentary under B to contrast it with A and explain why I thought B was necessary, but based on your comment I bet other people read it like you, so I have revised it to move that section and make it more clear, thank you. Also, I agree that the reading that the spell affects only you seems more reasonable - my only problem with it is that is not what the spell actually says. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kirt
    Commented Jun 15 at 18:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ On option A: time stop is inherently self-contradicting. It has a range of "self", but the text explicitly says it affects "everyone but yourself". So following the option A logic is following what the spell range says instead of the spell text. I know the 5e philosophy is that spells do what they say (no more, no less), but I don't know how it treats self-contradictions like that. \$\endgroup\$
    – Bobson
    Commented Jun 16 at 12:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Bobson The rules on range do say that spells with a range of self affect "only you" but 2 sentences later, they say "Once a spell is cast, its effects aren't limited by its range". Thus, "range: self" applies only when casting, not after, so there is no self-contradiction in time stop. A quick glance at all spells with a range of self shows that most of them affect other creatures to some extent. Dream says "Choose a creature known to you as the target of this spell". \$\endgroup\$
    – Kirt
    Commented Jun 16 at 17:31
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Will not work.

Time Stop's range/area is self. Anything that would prevent the spell working on you will stop the spell. That would include entering an anti-magic field.

A) Since the condition for ending the spell is part of the spell, does that mean it counts as a magical effect?

There isn't really any precedent for that in other rules or rulings - where a specific condition on the spell gets to float off as its own magical effect and be blocked or interact with things on the basis of being magical.

B) Does that mean that since that effect IS on the caster of Time Stop, that while they are within an Antimagic Field and Time Stop is active, they could make ranged attacks or otherwise interact with frozen people outside of the field?

This involves some double-think where the caster is affected by conditions on the spell in a way that can be "blocked" but not the recipient of the spell effects (so the spells benefits in this case don't get "blocked").

It is simpler here to read the range/area entry as normal for interpreting rules. The spell is on the caster as far as the rules are concerned, and effects that can prevent it working on the caster would include getting all magic on the caster suppressed or nullified.

Time Stop's duration is also instantaneous. Rules-wise, despite the spell's name, and alongside the range/area, this aligns better with considering the spell affecting only the caster, giving them some extra limited actions "outside of time", and not affecting the whole world by stopping it.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Time Stop's range is Self. Spell descriptions do not explicitly list what their targets are. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kirt
    Commented Jun 14 at 22:09
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Kirt - I was going from this listng - roll20.net/compendium/dnd5e/Time%20Stop#content - possibly not correct as not official content. Fixed it - as far as I am concerned this is the same thing. The spell is framed - rules wise - as affecting you (effectively super-speeding you), not the whole world around you \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jun 14 at 22:15
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    \$\begingroup\$ Roll20 does list spell targets, which can be useful - but these are not official. \$\endgroup\$
    – Kirt
    Commented Jun 14 at 22:22
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Time stop will end if you attack a creature that is outside the antimagic field

This spell ends if one of the actions you use during this period, or any effects that you create during this period, affects a creature other than you or an object being worn or carried by someone other than you.

If the creature you attack is outside of the antimagic field, you still created the effect or used the action. The spell is not suppressed outside the field, and there is no requirement for the effect or action to be magical, so you being non-magical does not matter at all. The condition is fulfilled and time stop will end.

If the creature is in the antimagic field with you, the effect of time stop on the creature is suppressed as this is a magical effect. You can attack it without time stop ending, but it is not helpless while you do so.

The targeting of time stop is obviously somewhat unclear - does it target only you, because you are exempt from the global effect on all other creatures? Does it target all other creatures because you stop the flow of time for them? Does it target both you and them? But for this question, we do not need to answer that.

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Either Time Stop ends instantly in the Antimagic Field or Time Stop is still active in the Antimagic Field.

Time Stop

Duration: Instantaneous

This spell ends if one of the actions you use during this period, or any effects that you create during this period, affects a creature other than you or an object being worn or carried by someone other than you.

Antimagic Field

This area is divorced from the magical energy that suffuses the multiverse.

Spells and other magical effects, except those created by an artifact or a deity, are suppressed in the sphere and can't protrude into it. [...] While an effect is suppressed, it doesn't function, but the time it spends suppressed counts against its duration.

Option 1: The caster is the target of the Time Stop

If you rule that the caster is the one affected by the Time Stop, creatures in the Antimagic Field will be stopped and entering the Antimagic Field would suppress the effect of the spell, turning time back to normal for the caster and ending the spell instantaneously, since the spell is instantaneous.

Option 2 : The world is the target of the Time Stop

If instead you rule that the world is affected by the Time Stop, creatures inside the Antimagic Field would be able to move inside the stopped time as long as they stay inside the field and entering the Antimagic Field would change nothing to the spell, it would still end if you affect another creature, since even if the spell is suppressed, it's still active.

I would go with the first option in my opinion, having multiple creatures able to move during stopped time would be a nightmare to manage (Does another creature in the Antimagic Field that affect a creature outside of the Field break the spell ?).

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