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I'm looking for a clarification in spells known per full heal-up. I'm looking at a 1st level wizard/necromancer multiclass as an example. A first level multiclass wizard gets 4 1st level spells per day (13 true ways, p111). A first level multiclass necromancer gets 3 1st level spells per day (13 true ways, p80). Further reading about multiclassing makes an emphasis that there is no power crossover between classes unless specifically mentioned or enabled by taking feats.

Am I correct in assuming this 1st level character can take 4 spells from the wizard list (1st level) and 3 spells from the necromancer list (1st level), or is there something I'm missing?

What gives me pause about this is that a first level wizard single-class gets 5 1st level spells and the idea that a multiclass caster will have more spells per day seems a bit odd. If that is correct though, I certainly won't be complaining!

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You are correct about the number of spells, but remember that your Key Modifier becomes your spellcasting attribute for both, which is the lower of Int and Chr (13TW pg 105), so while the character has access to more spells, they are likely casting them poorer than a single-classed character.

They will also always lag a level behind a single-casted caster in getting higher levels spells. For an extreme example, a 2nd level wizard with an Incremental Advance can already be casting a thirst level spell, while it takes a 3rd level wiz/necro with two Incr Adv spent to have a 3rd level spell in both castings, and the pure 3rd level wizard will still have more 3rd level spells.

To sum up, a multiclassed caster/caster vs. a single-classed caster will have more lower level spells, get delayed access to hgiher level spells, and will likely castthem worse because they Key Modifier is the lesser of two stats.

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