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Quicken spell says that:

Casting a quickened spell is a swift action.

Some spells, like snowball require a ranged touch attack:

You conjure a ball of packed ice and snow that you can throw at a single target as a ranged touch attack.

Is this all included as part of the swift action, so you could:

  1. Move action to wander around
  2. Attack as standard action, (eg throw a knife)
  3. Cast snowball as swift action (quicken spell) and make a ranged touch attack?
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Let's look at what the rules say about casting touch spells.

Ranged Touch Spells in Combat: Some spells allow you to make a ranged touch attack as part of the casting of the spell. These attacks are made as part of the spell and do not require a separate action. Ranged touch attacks provoke an attack of opportunity, even if the spell that causes the attacks was cast defensively. Unless otherwise noted, ranged touch attacks cannot be held until a later turn.

This isn't even a "free touch attack" as granted by a touch spell.

Touch Spells in Combat: Many spells have a range of touch. To use these spells, you cast the spell and then touch the subject. In the same round that you cast the spell, you may also touch (or attempt to touch) as a free action.

This is not even an action, it's part of casting the spell. Now let's look at what the rules say for casting a quickened spell.

Cast a Quickened Spell You can cast a quickened spell (see the Quicken Spell feat), or any spell whose casting time is designated as a free or swift action, as a swift action. Only one such spell can be cast in any round, and such spells don't count toward your normal limit of one spell per round. Casting a spell as a swift action doesn't incur an attack of opportunity.

There is nothing in there that limits the normal effects of whatever spell you're casting--so yes, you still get your ranged touch attack as part of casting the spell.

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Yes, the ranged touch attack is a part of the spell, and the spell as a whole is quickened. So your swift action includes the attack. There is nothing in the Quicken Spell feat that says attacks made as part of a spell are not quickened, and there is nothing in general about attacks that prevents them from being made as part of a swift action.

This is not that unusual, considering the large number of Core feats that allow attacks as free or non- actions, as Extraordinary abilities (e.g. Cleave, Improved Trip). Quicken Spell is explicitly magically-enhancing your speed, so it’s actually easier to imagine a large speed increase there.

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