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The level 3 Ranger power Disruptive Strike allows you to perform a ranged/melee attack as an immediate interrupt in response to you or an ally being attacked by a creature.

I would like help in understanding what happens when the ranger has a bow and triggers this after being hit by a melee strike. My understanding is the general rule is a ranged attack on an adjacent target allows the adjacent enemy to make an opportunity attack. In this situation that seems a little weird because the enemy was just interrupted, so how can he turn around and then attack?

Similar but different, the ranger uses this power when standing next to an enemy in response to an ally being attacked some distance away. Now it makes more sense for the ranger to be the target of an opportunity attack from the adjacent enemy because he is targeting a different enemy some distance away.

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A creature is unable to take opportunity actions on their own turn. So when you attack you will provoke attacks from anyone other that the creature whose action you interrupted.

DDI:

A creature cannot take an opportunity action on its own turn. The action interrupts some event on another creature’s turn.

Also Published in Player's Handbook, page(s) 268, Rules Compendium, page(s) 196.

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"I would like help in understanding what happens when the ranger has a bow and triggers this after being hit by a melee strike."

He won't provoke an Opportunity Attack from the attacking enemy since it's the enemy's turn. Opportunity Actions (it obviously includes opportunity attacks cause they're opportunity actions) can't be taken on a character's own turn, according to the Rules Compendium, page 28:

An opportunity action is like an immediate action, but it always interrupts its trigger. Also, a creature can take a single opportunity action on each turn except its own.

So if the Ranger interrupts an orc's attack, the orc can't take an opportunity action because it was the orc's turn. But if there were two orcs adjacent to the Ranger, one of them can normaly take his opportunity action because it's not that other orc's turn.

Similar but different, the ranger uses this power when standing next to an enemy in response to an ally being attacked some distance away. Now it makes more sense for the ranger to be the target of an opportunity attack from the adjacent enemy because he is targeting a different enemy some distance away.

In that case it happens just as you thought. The ranger provokes an opportunity attack because it's not the the adjacent enemy's turn, so he can take an opportunity action.

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