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The spell reads:

You cause the target to bleed from every orifice, and her organs and blood become suffused with positive energy. If the subject fails her Fortitude save, she takes 1d6 points of bleed damage per 4 caster levels (to a maximum of 4d6 at 16th level) when you cast this spell. Any creature that takes a full-round action to sup the blood of the bleeding subject heals a number of hit points equal to twice as many as the subject lost that round due to the bleed effect. The subject must be willing or helpless to sup her blood, which provokes attacks of opportunity. Only one creature can be healed in this way per round. The subject can lick her own wounds in this way to regain half as many hit points as she lost that round. If the bleeding effect is stopped or the spell's duration ends, the subject's blood no longer heals those who drink it, though in the latter case the subject continues to bleed until the bleeding is stopped via magical healing or a successful DC 15 Heal check.

Does the target take the 1d6 bleed damage every turn for the duration of the spell since the target gets the bleeding condition?

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    \$\begingroup\$ This spell is one of the weirdest things I have ever seen on a d20 system. Since the blood is coming out from the 'orifices' of the target creature, any casting of that spell can become gross really quick. \$\endgroup\$ – T. Sar - Reinstate Monica Mar 6 '15 at 19:59
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A target that fails the saving throw against the spell blood of the martyr is dealt the spell's bleed damage until the target loses the bleed condition in a manner described for that condition

Usually, the bleed condition is ended by receiving magical healing or a Heal skill check (DC 15).

The duration of the spell blood of the martyr describes how long the target's organs are "suffused with positive energy" therefore allowing 1 creature per round to take "a full-round action to sup the blood of the bleeding subject" and heal "a number of hit points equal to twice as many as the subject lost that round due to the bleed effect."

To clarify, the text continues: "If the bleeding effect is stopped or the spell's duration ends, the subject's blood no longer heals those who drink it, though in the latter case [of the spell's duration expiring] the subject continues to bleed..." Hence, if the bleed condition isn't removed prior to the spell's end, the bleed condition continues after the spell's duration expires. Which, seriously, could've been a lot clearer.

Characters of sufficient wealth should consider a scabbard of stanching even if otherwise unarmed.

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The target gets a chance to make a Fortitude save. If the save is failed, then yes, the target takes bleed damage every turn until it is stopped as specified in the description. This is 1d6 per four caster levels. So, if an 8th level character casts the spell, then the damage is 2d6 per turn (Taken at the beginning of the turn).

The target may drink their own blood to regain half of these hit points each time. However, if the target of the spell makes their Fortitude save chance, then they take no bleed damage from the spell. Bleed damage only occurs with a failed save.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Also note that gaining any magical HP healing is sufficient to stop the bleed, including the healing they gain from licking their own wounds. I doubt this is RAI, but RAW, they do this once, and both the healing effect and the bleeding damage end for that casting of the spell. \$\endgroup\$ – Matthew Najmon Mar 6 '15 at 16:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ @MatthewNajmon That's hilarious. But as a full-round action that provokes attacks of opportunity? That's rough. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Mar 6 '15 at 16:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ @HeyICanChan Well, licking your own wounds can be really hard. I would die if I needed to lick my elbow to survive! Someone can surely crack my head open while I try to do that. \$\endgroup\$ – T. Sar - Reinstate Monica Mar 6 '15 at 20:02

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