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Can a Craft skill check or other mundane or magical means resize a weapon of legacy?

For example, the +1 silver Small shortsword Full Moon's Trick, a weapon of legacy, is acquired by a Medium creature. Is there a way to turn Full Moon's Trick into a Medium shortsword that will permit the Medium creature to use Full Moon's Trick without a penalty because of the wielder's and weapon's different sizes?

Note that additional magical abilities can't be added to a weapon of legacy (Weapons of Legacy 11).

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No, there are no rules for using the skill Craft to resize a weapon...

The skill Craft has specific applications, and resizing a weapon isn't one of them. The DM must fabricate rules for doing this if the DM wants this to be an option in the campaign.

... But a mutable legacy item can be founded for a weapon of legacy

Full Moon's Trick's wielder can ask the DM if he can found a legacy item (WL 179) that's a mutable legacy item (WL 206-7) that alters 1 or more of Full Moon's Trick's legacy abilities. A generous DM using the optional mutable legacy item rules could allow that item to replace one of Full Moon Trick's legacy abilities with the ability to change its size upon command.

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Well, According to the Pathfinder SRD:

Inappropriately Sized Weapons: A creature can't make optimum use of a weapon that isn't properly sized for it. A cumulative –2 penalty applies on attack rolls for each size category of difference between the size of its intended wielder and the size of its actual wielder. If the creature isn't proficient with the weapon, a –4 non proficiency penalty also applies.

That said a small short sword is pretty much mechanically identical to a medium dagger. It would not be unreasonable to say that if they were to take the weapon with a smith that could craft a magic weapon, then that smith could create a medium dagger handle which could slip over the short sword handle so that the -2 penalty is negated and the Full Moon's Trick is now considered a medium dagger. Of course this isn't in the Rules As Written, but a very reasonable DM Fiat based of Rule 0.

Rule 0: First and foremost, an RPG is meant to be fun. It's the DM's job not only to enforce the rules, but to ensure the rules don't get in the way of the fun.

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    \$\begingroup\$ If nothing else, the same quote about inappropriately-sized weapons also exists in 3.5. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Mar 19 '15 at 18:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ I'm almost certain there's something in the 3.5 PHB or DMG that says a small shortsword is functionally identical to a medium dagger, and can be used as such without modification. May have been an optional rule, but 99% sure it's at least in the book(s). \$\endgroup\$ – Adeptus Mar 20 '15 at 1:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you'd check the D20SRD just under the weapon size/damage chart here: d20srd.org/srd/equipment/weapons.htm, you'll see nearly the identical text from the Pathfinder SRD. In almost all respects, a small short sword is like a medium dagger, only differences is the -2 to hit, and the fact a short sword doesn't have a ranged increment. \$\endgroup\$ – The Amused Muse Mar 20 '15 at 1:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Adeptus That's old school, yo. Those are Dungeons and Dragons, Third Edition rules. Dungeons and Dragons 3.5 changed just about everything about weapon size, including the exact rules you're thinking of. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Mar 20 '15 at 12:29
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A 4' 10" dwarf and a 6' 3" human are both technically "medium" creatures, yet there is no penalty if one wants to pass a set of full plate to the other. It's a very short step from there to the common house rule that enchanted gear resizes itself to fit the wearer. Because magic.

If you really want to make item size a thing in your game, a magical forge or super-talented NPC smith who can resize magic items is a reasonable addition. After all, in a world where the heroes routinely hurl fireballs from their fingertips, fly, and raise the dead, a little thing like reforging a blade (or transferring its enchantments to a new one) shouldn't trip them up.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok. That makes sense. I thought since it's a Legacy item that may change the way it works. \$\endgroup\$ – Cataru Moore Mar 19 '15 at 16:14
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    \$\begingroup\$ There are specific enhancements that allow magic items to resize to fit their user, so having them automatically resize would render those enhancements moot. \$\endgroup\$ – David Reeve Mar 19 '15 at 17:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ Which is why it's a house rule, not canon. House rules render stuff moot all the time. \$\endgroup\$ – Will Martin Mar 19 '15 at 17:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ +1 because of the idea that a LEGACY item can resize. Hell, a tome of battle legacy item is medium and becomes large. Lycanthropy transcends race, and it's simple enough to change. While not any enchanted gear, but legacy items make sense for this \$\endgroup\$ – Cataru Moore Mar 19 '15 at 18:22

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