4
\$\begingroup\$

I was wondering if you can plane shift to a plane you never visited since you seem to need to specify a destination?

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Related. Although for D&D 3.5, Pathfinder raises similar questions. Further, consider defining in the campaign's house rules the term destination, perhaps as in this answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Apr 30 '15 at 12:58
6
\$\begingroup\$

You don't need to visit a plane to go there.

The only thing that the description of plane shift says about where you arrive is:

you appear 5 to 500 miles (5d%) from your intended destination

Compare this with teleport, which says:

You must have some clear idea of the location and layout of the destination.

Teleport also has a bunch of other information about targeting a location, which says (among other things) that you need to at least see a place to teleport there. Since some transport magic specifically says that you need to see a place to go there, it implies that spells that don't say you need to see a place to go there, don't have that requirement.

The fact that plane shift says that you arrive near your destination, you do need to have a destination. However, this can be defined any way that your DM considers precise enough to count as a 'location'. For example, you could say that you wanted to go to a particular githyanki outpost in the Astral Plane, or a particular efreet keep on the Plane of Fire that you've heard of. As long as you can name a place, you can plane shift there.

\$\endgroup\$
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Is it worth saying something about tuning forks here? (I upvoted, but the tuning fork is the main way DMs prevent players from plane shift-ing anywhere in the multiverse.) \$\endgroup\$ – Miniman Apr 30 '15 at 4:19
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Is it? That's odd, I've never seen it ruled that way. The 'tuning fork' doesn't have a gold cost, and "Assume that focus components of negligible cost are in your spell component pouch." There is similar wording on the 3.5 SRD. I've never played in a game where the 'tuning fork' was a thing that mattered. \$\endgroup\$ – DuckTapeAl Apr 30 '15 at 4:49
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Huh. It's not on the SRD, but the 3.5 PHB has: "Forked rods keyed to certain planes or dimensions may be difficult to come by, as decided by the GM." I think the primary purpose is to make sure that you can't get into Mordenkainen's personal demiplane and grab all his stuff. \$\endgroup\$ – Miniman Apr 30 '15 at 4:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Minor nitpicking perhaps, but don't you automatically visit a plane when you go there? Unless you meant "You don't have to have visited a plane before to go there"? \$\endgroup\$ – Theik Apr 30 '15 at 7:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ @thedarkwanderer The spell plane shift in Pathfinder requires a forked rod as its focus, regardless of the spell's source. (Check the spell's Components entry.) \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Apr 30 '15 at 12:25
6
\$\begingroup\$

As a component of the spell Plane Shift it is required that you have a forked metal rod attuned to the plane of travel.

As long as that requirement is met you can travel to any plane - whether or not you've visited it previously.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.