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Spell resistance does not stack, but rather overlaps.

Spell Resistance on the PFSRD.

Does that mean that one overcomes the other (you only have one spell resistance even if both are equal, enemies only roll once)?

Or does that mean you have two "layers" of SR, meaning if an enemy beats one they still have to beat the other?

Currently debating in a game where someone will be gaining SR 15+Class Level from two classes (gestalt game)

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1 Answer 1

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"Overlaps" means "only the highest applies".

Whenever the rules say that something overlaps something else, it means that only the highest thing applies. For example: if you get 5 temporary HP from one casting of false life, and 10 from a subsequent casting before you take damage, then you only have 10 temporary hit points. If you take 10 damage, you apply that to your temporary hit points, and then have 0 temporary hit points left.

Likewise, if you have SR from multiple sources, you only get the highest version. Thus, if you get SR 20 from one class, and SR 15 from the other, you only have SR 20.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Actually, Temporary HP apparently stack if they're from different sources according to the Paizo FAQ (I know that's not a very reliable source sometimes but still it's the only thing that says one way or the other) \$\endgroup\$
    – Dorian
    Apr 30, 2015 at 2:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ I changed the example to be more clear about what I meant. \$\endgroup\$
    – DuckTapeAl
    Apr 30, 2015 at 2:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ Someone in our game chat brought up DR, which honestly is probably a better way to explain it than Temporary HP since Temp HP from different sources does stack, and this is SR from different sources. DR "overlaps" in a way but different types of DR don't "stack" ontop of eachother (example: DR 5/silver and DR 3/cold iron, if a weapon is neither its damage is only reduced by 5). As it is, thus far through reading many different sources there's nothing very comparable to this though. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dorian
    Apr 30, 2015 at 6:08

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