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I know that every kingdom is constructed out of hexes and it's the basis for how large a kingdom is. This goes into what improvements it can have, how many, where the settlements are, ect. But one thing I'm having a hard time finding is how large, physically, those hexes are. Even if I can get a ballpark number, I need something to try and outline the scale of the land mass that I'm trying to create and how many hexes to break it up into. A good example of known landscapes and land masses with hex grids on already would also be helpful.

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d20PFSRD on Kingdom Building:

Like the exploration system, the kingdom-building rules measure terrain in hexes. Each hex is 12 miles from corner to corner, representing an area of just less than 95 square miles. The hex measurement is an abstraction; the hexes are easy to quantify and allow the GM to categorize a large area as one terrain type without having to worry about precise borders of forests and other terrain features.

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    \$\begingroup\$ “Corner to corner” has apparently been misunderstood by some people (including 3PP designers) to mean the length of one edge. So for the record: that's 12 miles across the middle at the widest point. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Sep 10 '15 at 20:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ @GMJoe Mathematicians/engineers apparently have the opposite convention as RPGs. You sanity check the meaning though, because otherwise you get hexes of ~375 sq. miles instead of ~95. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Sep 11 '15 at 4:16
  • \$\begingroup\$ Of course, the one paragraph that I'm looking for is the one I seem to have read over without realizing it. Thanks! \$\endgroup\$ – CrystalBlue Sep 11 '15 at 11:31
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In every other game I've ever played, hexes are measured by their edge to edge distance, because that is the way you move from one to another. For whatever reason, PF says their 12 mile hexes are measured corner to corner, which gives an edge to edge distance of about 10.4 miles.

The area of said hex is a bit over 93.5 square miles, which is close to 100 square miles, a nice round number. I suspect that is the reason why. The area of a hex 12 miles across is a bit under 125 square miles.

In my works, I have used the edge to edge distance (like everyone else in the entire world does) of 12 miles. This is exactly 4 hours to walk across for someone whose speed is 30, or allows 2 hexes of travel per day along roads without having to force-march. (For people whose speed is 20, this is 6 hours to cross a hex, and for those with a speed of 40 it's 3 hours to cross; very easy math for the bulk of situations.) It's also a lot closer to 125 square miles than a 10.4 mile hex is to 100, meaning I have vastly smaller rounding errors.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, meant to add: an easy way to find the area of the hex is to square the edge to edge distance, then multiply by 7/8. (The more precise number to multiply by is sqrt(3/4).) IIRC, you may alternately square the corner to corner distance and multiply by 3/4 as an approximation. \$\endgroup\$ – TheDS Feb 14 '18 at 20:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi, and welcome to RPG Stack Exchange! Check out our tour to see how we work here. You should edit that into your post via the edit button in the bottom left -- comments are transient and get cleaned away eventually. We also have a full edit history of posts, so just put it wherever you would do so (avoid using an "edit:" section like one does on a forum). \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Feb 14 '18 at 20:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ This seems to consist of more side discussion than focused answer. You might want to improve it as an answer by reducing the focus on things that aren't answering how big PF Kingdom Builder hexes are and focusing more on the topic. (If this seems an odd recommendation, consider that this site is not a discussion forum, and this is not a threaded discussion.) \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Feb 14 '18 at 21:20

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