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I'd like to have my players overcome a challenge as a party. In my specific case I want them to track down a location in a large area. How quickly they find the location would be based on the result of some kind of skill check. If they fail, they would have to try again the next day, risking the dangers of the night time. Is there a mechanic similar to this in Pathfinder?

I somewhat remember something from D&D where various members of the party had to succeed multiple skill checks of different types to run away from an approaching danger. It seemed like a fun way to rally the party around specific player's skills.

Edit: I'm pretty sure tuggyne is right. I was thinking of Complex Skill Checks.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Are the PCs on a clock to find this (presumably immobile) location? What happens if they don't find it? Are they assured of finding it eventually? \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Oct 4 '15 at 19:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ None that I'm aware of. There was a discussion about this some years back over at the Paizo forums: paizo.com/threads/rzs2l88n?Skill-Challenges-for-Pathfinder \$\endgroup\$ – thomax Oct 5 '15 at 12:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ RPG are about having players make interesting choices. Where is the interesting choice in "I roll a bunch of dice until I succeed"? \$\endgroup\$ – Dale M Oct 5 '15 at 23:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ While I haven't tried this before (And as such this isn't an answer), the Chase mechanic looks like it may be part of what you are looking for if you remove the chasing party, and just use the obstacles. \$\endgroup\$ – Nyoze Oct 7 '15 at 8:15
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In a comment that now seems to be deleted, someone pointed out Complex Skill Checks

Here's how they work:

In such a case, a specific number of successful skill checks must be achieved to complete the task. The complexity of the task is reflected in the DC of the required check, the number of successful rolls required to complete the task, and the maximum number of failed rolls that can occur before the attempt fails.

This is exactly what I was looking for.

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