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I am looking for a clarification. As per the DMG (p.192), the Ring of spell storing is "charged: when:

Any creature can cast a spell of 1st through 5th level into the ring by touching the ring as the spell is cast. The spell has no effect, other than to be stored in the ring.

My question is this: If someone (the party rogue for example), were to touch an enemy caster with the ring during their casting of a spell, would the ring's "charging" effect happen?

It is my understanding that if it does, one of the following two effects would take place:

  1. The ring would store the spell if there is enough space.

  2. The ring would cause the spell to fail, as per the next sentence in the DMG:

    If the ring can't hold the spell, the spell is expended without effect.

Now I am looking for a RAW or RAI answer, as I am fully aware that as a DM I can override if I think it is necessary.

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    \$\begingroup\$ And now I see the need to begin research into a Ring of Spell Snaring...or some such item ;) \$\endgroup\$ – user23715 Oct 6 '15 at 21:29
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Emphasis mine:

Any creature can cast a spell of 1st through 5th level into the ring by touching the ring as the spell is cast. The spell has no effect, other than to be stored in the ring.

It does not say that any spell cast while touching it must be stored into the ring. Interpreting it like that would mean that a caster wearing this ring would be basically unable to use many of their spells.

This would not only require twisting the RAW wording (by using a non standard definition of "can"), but also feels like against RAI in your example: an item that could be used to repeatedly cancel the casting of any spells under 5th level that only requires a reaction to use and that is never expended is by comparison way stronger than everything else in the rare category. Compare that to the legendary Ring of Spell Turning which merely grants advantage on saving throws and counters spells completely only when you get a natural 20. Or compare with Rod of Absorption which is very rare and has a limited number of charges.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener May 9 '17 at 22:55
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Any creature can cast a spell of 1st through 5th level into the ring by touching the ring as the spell is cast. The spell has no effect, other than to be stored in the ring.

The creature has to want to cast the spell into the ring for it to be stored. That is clear from the text.

Interestingly, though, it does appear that you don't have to be wearing the ring to do this, though as with any ring you would have to be wearing it to activate it.

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Any creature can cast a spell of 1st through 5th level into the ring by touching the ring as the spell is cast. The spell has no effect, other than to be stored in the ring.

The word touching here seems to indicate an action rather than a state of being. I think whether worn or not, you redirect the spell currently on your fingertips into the ring by "touching it".

It does not says, "...at any time when you are in contact with the ring..." Nor "...if the ring is touching you..." nor "...if you are wearing the ring..." All of which indicate a passive form of touching or connection rather than the action of touching

That is my interpretation anyway and gives you a trigger that indicates clear intent.

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No, the caster is the one that can have the spell stored. "Any creature can cast a spell of 1st through 5th level into the ring by touching the ring as the spell is cast.". The phrase "creature can cast a spell into" refers to the caster exclusively. There is clearly an intent required, simply wearing the ring would negate any spell casting in the latter interpretation.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Right. Otherwise the ring, rather than the caster, would be the subject of the sentence. \$\endgroup\$ – Dan Henderson Nov 19 '15 at 22:43

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