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My character is a folk hero. My plan is already approved by my DM.

When my character was young(barely old enoigh to remember his village), his village was destroyed by forces unknown to him (Raiders, marauders or something of that like). The destruction caught the attention of a passing Dragon. The Dragon found my character. Feeling compassion for the defenseless child adopted the it.

Based on D&D canon, what type of dragon is most likely to do this? What metallic or good dragon is most likely to do this, if different?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Select a correct answer? \$\endgroup\$ – Nemenia Mar 10 '16 at 0:51
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Silver dragons are canonically the most interested in humanoids, having always found them fascinating and engaged in interaction with humanoids on a very regular basis, especially humans, and would most likely empathise with an abandoned human or other race and take it in.

Other dragons are often too aloof or alien in their thinking to consider raising a child from a different race, though if you really need a secondary choice, gold dragons very rarely take an interest in outside situations and could find a humanoid interesting enough to raise

On the other hand, if you've already decided on a color, the dragon the same color as you would feel alot more kinship with a lost dragonborn of their ancestry

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If you're going to downvote me, at least say why \$\endgroup\$ – Nemenia Nov 12 '15 at 4:27
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    \$\begingroup\$ I didn't downvote you, but it's a reasonably common practice in these parts to downvote answers given to questions that are likely to be closed. Answers squeaking in before closure somewhat subverts the point of closing. \$\endgroup\$ – Miniman Nov 12 '15 at 4:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ It's also common practice to not say why. We use comments to suggest improvements or clarification. If we just think an answer's flat-out irrecoverably incorrect, low quality, or so on, there is rarely anything gained from anyone saying so. I mean, we might think "but I could learn something from them!" - usually not, because they just flat-out disagree with you, so this almost always causes arguments because we feel compelled to defend our answers from people who are just horribly wrong in their viewpoints. Get used to anonymous downvotes, they're better than the alternative. \$\endgroup\$ – doppelgreener Nov 12 '15 at 5:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ @doppelgreener Will discuss in chat with you sometime. \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Nov 12 '15 at 16:05
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    \$\begingroup\$ @doppelgreener if it's for squeaking in, though, a comment would be good. Downvotes based on procedural desires would be well-advised to make clear those desires, so that people can change their behavior appropriately. I usually downvote answers to obviously closable questions, but yours is fine and the question is fine, so +1 from me. \$\endgroup\$ – the dark wanderer Nov 15 '15 at 18:44
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The metallic dragons of the 5E Monster Manual have fairly distinct personalities, but being metallic dragons they're all Good sorts, and any breed could believably adopt a humanoid orphan like your character.

The most likely is probably a silver dragon, though: "The friendliest and most social of the metallic dragons, silver dragons cheerfully assist good creatures in need."

You could also pick a dragon with a favored habitat that corresponds to the area in which your character was born:

  • Brass: "hot, dry climates"
  • Bronze: "coastal dwellers"
  • Copper: "hills and rocky uplands"
  • Gold: "out-of-the-way places"
  • Silver: "secluded cold mountain peaks"

Of course, wherever your character's village may have been, any color of dragon could fortuitously pass by.

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