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I have a large group playing DnD. Some players are doing well with it, others not so much.

A "not so much" player is the Druid. he runs through encounters setting fire to everything, including the forest -- which seems to not be the style for a Druid.

I'm struggling creatively (writer's block as it were) to come up with a method of stripping the player's Druidic powers, and then working out some kind of challenge system that works in-line with Druid teachings for him to redeem himself and restore his powers.

What consequences are for a Druid not acting like a Druid?

What training (or remedial training) is required to be a Druid?

Where does a Druid's power come from and how can that link be severed?

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marked as duplicate by Tritium21, nitsua60, Miniman, Joshua Aslan Smith, SevenSidedDie dnd-5e Nov 29 '15 at 9:13

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Your question will most likely be closed. I suggest you edit your question beforehand so it asks an actual question. If you are asking for ideas and suggestions, we cannot help you. If you, instead, ask What consequences will there be for a Druid not acting like a Druid? you will have a better chance of getting answers. Good luck! \$\endgroup\$ – Joninean Nov 28 '15 at 20:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ how large is your "large group"? \$\endgroup\$ – nitsua60 Nov 28 '15 at 21:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @nitsua60 its' 8 players \$\endgroup\$ – Nutter4ever Nov 28 '15 at 21:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ Fundamentally, what's the problem you're having? He isn't playing a druid the way you like? He's derailing the table? Distracting other players? Hogging spotlight? Put another way, what does it mean that "some players are doing well"? \$\endgroup\$ – nitsua60 Nov 28 '15 at 21:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ All of the above. It's not just though that they are a druid, it could be any class. To deal with them, I don't have power to ask them to behave, I don't have the power to kick them off the table. Only thing I do have is my DMing, and so I have to roleplay out the punishment, they set fire to important things, punish them. And I'm trying to work out how to do such a thing in-line with them being a druid. I could go down the generic route of having the guards arrest them, but I'd like to have that trick for if the non-spell casters get out of line. And I have bigger plans for that. \$\endgroup\$ – Nutter4ever Nov 28 '15 at 22:46
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In the 5e PHB I didn't find any specific text about what happens to a druid who breaks alignment, so it seems like we're in house-rule territory here.

I believe that it's important to give a player clear warning before assigning a code-of-conduct penalty. If your druid tries to do something completely inappropriate, give them a warning right there: "Your mental connection to the powers of nature is wavering. Your animal companion turns and growls at you -- it's angry that you're acting against nature. As a druid, you need to act in tune with nature or you could lose your druid powers. Are you sure you want to do this?"

If they go ahead with it, you could treat it similarly as you do for a cleric: they lose their spellcasting and wild shape, and their animal companion stops obeying orders. (Perhaps their animal companion actively opposes them when they try to do something inappropriate.) I recommend letting them get their powers back fairly quickly if they decide they're willing to act like a proper druid; punishing people is not fun, so you should only do it just as much as absolutely necessary.


It's not totally clear from your question, but it sounds like you might have a larger problem, which is that your druid player isn't taking your game seriously -- they're using it as time to act out and be ridiculous. The worry is that, even if you get them not to break their druid oath, they might find other ways to annoy you, such as picking fights with friendly NPCs.

As DM, it's your responsibility to make sure the game is fun, and in some cases that might include asking people to leave the game when they're disrupting it. Try to do this as respectfully as possible -- explain that you're trying to run a serious game, and you don't think their play style is a good fit for your table.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for that, I appreciate it's house-rules stuff, it's just trying to get a grasp on how best to approach it. \$\endgroup\$ – Nutter4ever Nov 28 '15 at 21:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ My other problem is while I am the DM, it's a private group of friends of a friend who asked me to run, and they supply the venue. I don't want to stop DMing, the venue is great (read as I get free supply of food and coffee) and for the most part the players are great, just the one druid who happens to be putting off one or two of the excellent players, and the guy who organised it seems a little blind to it. Trying to make entertainment of bring the druid into line. \$\endgroup\$ – Nutter4ever Nov 28 '15 at 22:06

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