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The description of Parma Magica, and the many examples, show that magically propelled substances (in this case, the air) touch the target, but not with any force, unless it penetrates the parma.

Wings of the Soaring Wind is a touch range spell, which I assume means the maga affects the air that is touching her, causing it to fly her around. We also know that suppressing your parma requires concentration, and is impossible if unconscious. I don't know where I heard this, but I believe your parma works against your own spells, unless they are personal range (which Wings, if I'm reading correctly, cannot be - you are not the air).

RAW, does this mean that Wings can only be used by

  1. penetrating your own Parma (tricky, if you have the auram to cast Wings)

  2. suppressing your parma (requires concentration, as does the spell; losing either dumps you on the ground).

  3. Not casting parma (do mages ever do this)?

So, to summarize:

Does this spell work in some special way, or are the above fixes necessary?

(Assuming the spell is broken RAW,) Can the spell be storyguided into reasonableness?

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Your analysis appears sound. The only minor point where I disagree with it is that, because it's CrAu rather than ReAu, the spell creates a magical wind (itself a magical thing) rather than using magic to move the air around the caster. By analogy with the "jet of magical water" vs. "jet of normal water driven by magic" examples on ArM5 p.85, this means that, rather than hitting the magus with no force, a CrAu wind would part and go around him, not hitting at all.

The bit about having your own non-Personal spells having to penetrate is also on p.85: "Spells cast with Personal range do not have to overcome magic resistance. Spells cast with Touch range, even if cast by the maga on herself, do."

As for finding a way to make it work, there is one potential loophole in the list of examples on p.86: "If the maga steps onto a magical bridge, it remains and will bear her weight." If the troupe chooses to treat a magically-created wind as if it were a solid object (equivalent to a magical bridge) rather than as a motion (equivalent to a jet of magical water), then the spell would work as described, without needing to penetrate.

However, this would presumably also mean that hostile CrAu spells would be able to lift magi and magical creatures other than the caster without needing to penetrate Magic Resistance, so I don't think it's a particularly good solution.

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    \$\begingroup\$ As per the answers to rpg.stackexchange.com/questions/16393/…, there's precedent for moving an object that a magus stands on top of. I share your misgivings about allowing magic resistance to be worked around in this way, but apparently moving magi by moving stuff underneath them isn't a problem. \$\endgroup\$ – GMJoe Dec 8 '15 at 0:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Well that sucks XD. I built my first Magus as a creo aurum specialist basically so I could know this spell straight out of gauntlet. RIP levels. Any other clever ideas for turning high Creo Auram into flight? :D \$\endgroup\$ – Mongoose1021 Dec 8 '15 at 8:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ CrAu really only lends itself to Wings of Soaring Wind, however try this: you create/aquire a set of wings like a glider, parachute, whatever. The caster's Parma doesn't normally extend well beyond their body, so you could use the glider to fly, using the same Creo Auram effect to fly around. It's horridly clunky but would work. Same spell arguably could be used to propell a ship on the water too. \$\endgroup\$ – ironboundtome Jan 10 '16 at 8:03
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Couldn't you state that you're using a really, really powerful Arcane Connection of yourself --you?

So you can decide wether your spells ignore your Magic Resistance or not. Maybe this suppresses an intended purpose of 5th edition Magic Resistance, but I'm not sure if this is truly intended or just collateral.

Or make this a Spell Mastery option?

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