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I am writing a house rules document for a Pathfinder game. Not publishing it would be a pity, and not using OGL to publish it likewise, since publishing the house rules under OGL allows others to use the same content.

Can I add links to various SRDs in the document?

For example, if I link to the website of Paizo, the link might be http://paizo.com/pathfinderRPG/prd/coreRulebook/gettingStarted.html. The link contains the word paizo, which is designated as product identity in Paizo's SRD. I suspect that this is also the case with SRDs maintained by third parties.

Quoting or not quoting text from other OGL content

Currently I do not quote any text from any other OGL publication (aside from the license text). Later, I may quote such material, which would make it necessary for me to attribute the text to its proper source. Suppose the source is a Pathfinder product (and the quoted text is open content). Does this change the answer to the first question?

Content of the document

The document has content such as: "Player may choose zero or one traits for the character, or two traits and one drawback."

It also contains more substantial content, such as a rewritten version of the content of this blog post: https://ropeblogi.wordpress.com/2016/05/25/religious-tenets-for-clerics/

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    \$\begingroup\$ Bear in mind that links are not guaranteed to be static - they can rework the SRD at any time and change the page names. \$\endgroup\$ – Matt Thomason May 26 '16 at 11:35
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Can I add links to various SRDs in the document?

Yes, you almost certainly can. The D20 PFSRD does it all the time. If you add a copyright notice according to section 6 of the OGL, there shouldn't be anything objectionable.

Quoting or not quoting text from other OGL content

Again, according to section 6, you need to add a copyright notice. Then you should be clear.

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    \$\begingroup\$ D20pfsrd uses the Pathfinder compatibility license d20pfsrd.com/extras/community-use which gives them explicit permission to use product identity, such as the phrase Pathfinder roleplaying game. \$\endgroup\$ – Thanuir May 26 '16 at 9:52

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