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As a rogue, I used acrobat's blade trick with a magical dagger in an attempt to hit two flying creatures adjacent to me. At the time, the DM let me hit the creatures, although we remain unsure as to whether this was the correct ruling, as we could not find any specific rules to deal with this situation.

Could this close burst attack hit the flying creatures?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ How high up were the fliers? \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Jul 11 '16 at 21:29
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    \$\begingroup\$ Hi MrL Machado; welcome to the site! I made an edit to your question to correct some grammatical and spelling errors, and make your question clearer. If you think that I have changed your meaning, you are very welcome to roll back the edit. \$\endgroup\$ – Ladifas Jul 11 '16 at 22:09
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When the rules talk about squares, they are looking at the 2d map seen from above.

Then, flying creatures and creatures that are on top of terrain at a different height come into the equation. The easiest way to model their interaction* is to go into full 3D mode: Areas are now cubes and creatures occupy cubes.

If the now-cubic power includes a cube that is occupied by the enemy, it can hit.

It is now a little easier to trace free trajectories from the most favorable vertex of your cube to the most favorable vertexes of the enemy's cube, so I suggest to keep using the square's base to check for cover.

*Not really. The easiest way is to work with the 2d map and never adventure into height realm.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You should probably mention what the size of a square is. From my experience of 4e some time ago, I recall forgetting the size of a square, as all distances were simply stated in 'squares'. \$\endgroup\$ – Ladifas Jul 11 '16 at 22:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Ladifas The size of a square is 1 square. When necessary, 1 square = 5 feet. \$\endgroup\$ – Michaellogg Jul 12 '16 at 0:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Ladifas when people say 4e is a videogame, they mean Tomb Raider: the world is built in 1-square-side long cubes. No need to measure anything in feet. \$\endgroup\$ – Zachiel Jul 12 '16 at 18:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Zachiel And don't forget that medium size PC occupy one square high in 3D, i.e. 5 feet tall, unlike older edition where you have "tall creature". \$\endgroup\$ – Sheepy Aug 12 '16 at 2:58

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