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An incorporeal creature can enter or pass through solid objects, but must remain adjacent to the object’s exterior, and so cannot pass entirely through an object whose space is larger than its own. What decides a creature space? 5 feet for medium? Can they pass through 5 feet thick walls, but not 10 (or 6)? What if the wall has a tiny opening/window/hole/tube? Can they squeeze through that? (perhaps does it count as surface facing?)

I'd like RAW and RAI answers and reasonable (based on balance or enjoyment or experience or whatever) house rules too.

Note: It appears Libris Mortis on page 140 has clarification on rules for Incorporeal, and arguably some extra rules too.

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The space of a creature is dictated by its size. For example, Medium and Small creatures have a space of one square (5ft, or 1.5m).

In absence of any in-game definition of what a surface is, I would personally use the boundary between the solid and a mass of liquid or gas (so not the boundary between mortar and brick). How large this should be (is a microfracture enough?) is below the granularity used by the rules and the DM should choose. I would personally not put myself in the position of having to think about it, but a continuous crack or a tube could be considered surfaces and, while touching the air in there, the incorporeal creature should be able to traverse even thick walls.

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    \$\begingroup\$ As an alternative, the 1-ft. hole necessary for a spell's line of effect (PH 174) might also be reasonable. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Aug 10 '16 at 13:55

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