3
\$\begingroup\$

Most people in the Inverse World setting live on the floating landmasses of the Island Ring, some of which are the size of continents. But since the sun in this world is down, below the islands, people live on the side away from the sun.

So is it dark all the time?

It seems like it would always be dark in the cities on the topsides of the islands.

If it is dark all the time in the areas where most people live, I'd expect people to be adjusted for that, like nocturnal or underground creatures in the real world: either seeing infrared light or using sonar to navigate. Either of these would be important for players to know about.

But then I read the playbook for the Rainlord, and I see that they have a special ability available (Aspect: Liquidity: Light) that prevents them from getting lost due to darkness. That makes it sound like darkness is an impediment to people in this world.

As the GM, I'm trying to figure out how to describe this world to the players. If most civilization dwells in the dark, that's a very significant piece of information. I know we could just make something up ourselves, but as a starting point, I'd really like to know how the Inverse World is normally understood.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

After a quick reread of the setting section, I wasn't able to find anything to address this. It seems that this is one of the many parts of the setting that each table is supposed to fill in with their own creativity. But, the obvious answer is that there's no reason for it to be any darker on top of an island than immediately after sunset on the inside-out world of the players: clouds and even nominally-clear air scatter light pretty well. (Living on one of the islands within the Cloud Sea would be pretty amazing.) Other possibilities for topside illumination, if you decide you want it, could be reflection from the Worldcrust (imagine a full moon covering the entire sky), lightwells of air or crystal through the island, luminescent plants, swarms of glowing butterflies, or whatever you can invent.

Darkness would still happen deep inside buildings or ships, underground (Hidden Cities), and possibly when Sola's face is hidden by thick clouds or other phenomena, so Aspect: Liquidity: Light is far from useless.

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you're on top of a continent-sized piece of rock that's blocking all the light from the sun, how much light would you actually get from atmospheric scattering around the sides? (Probably a physics question, but still...) \$\endgroup\$ – Joe Aug 30 '16 at 18:55
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Of course there are no hard distances given, but the descriptions in the book don't suggest anything like continent-sized. On the other hand, physics clearly has little place in Inverse World, so the answer is "as much light as your game needs". \$\endgroup\$ – Trip Space-Parasite Aug 30 '16 at 19:03
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ Alternate possibility: reflected light from the Worldcrust. Imagine the full moon spanning the whole sky. \$\endgroup\$ – Trip Space-Parasite Aug 30 '16 at 19:03
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ On page 8 of the book it says "These islands vary in size, from massive continents of stone down to rocks barely large enough...". \$\endgroup\$ – Joe Aug 30 '16 at 19:05
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Fair enough. Worldcrust reflection, then, or luminescent plants, or lightwells through the island. Different for every island! \$\endgroup\$ – Trip Space-Parasite Aug 30 '16 at 19:09

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.