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Do people use random number generators to roll dice?

I figure it might help those that lack hands or other means to roll traditional dice. It might help dungeonmasters that lack hands as well!

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    \$\begingroup\$ Answerers please note that this is basically a yes/no question; don't fill this up with 200 kinds of non-dice number generation because that's not the question. \$\endgroup\$ – mxyzplk Sep 3 '16 at 3:11
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    \$\begingroup\$ Technically, a dice is a random number generator... \$\endgroup\$ – Adeptus Feb 9 '17 at 2:31
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Basically any online game must use a random number generator, simply because it’s really awkward to demonstrate your rolls of physical dice to people who aren’t in the room, and typing out the results is tedious even if you’re honest.

So yes, random number generators are used instead of dice all the time. I cannot imagine that anyone would object to their use at a table, as well, to assist someone who cannot physically roll their own dice. A DM may want to investigate the RNG to ensure it is sound (some are decidedly not, but most are), but beyond that I shouldn’t think it would be a problem.

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I've used one at the table several times before. The app Game Master 5 for D&D5E has a dice roller included in several of the spells. There's plenty of free rollers online if you have a quick google and in all honesty, it's fairly simple to program an HTML one yourself.

As an aside, it can also help massively when you have a large number of dice to roll, such as a Rogue's sneak attack when it gets to 5d6, it's much quicker and easier to punch this into a dice roller and get the total.

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