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I broke a pearl worth 1,000 platinum into five pieces (I thought it was a horcrux of sorts, don't judge me). Two pieces have been used as magic projectiles; we still have 3 of them.

Can the make whole spell repair it fully?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Ah, the old "Smash everything you find just in case it turns out to be Evil" gambit. A true classic. \$\endgroup\$ – GreedyRadish Sep 14 '16 at 20:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ Was the whole pearl magical when found, or were the two pieces used as ammunition made magical after the pearl was broken? Also, did the pearl pieces used as ammunition hit their targets? \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Sep 15 '16 at 0:02
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No.

D&D 3.5

First let's take a look at the rules for the spells:

Mending: repairs small breaks or tears in objects (but not warps, such as might be caused by a warp wood spell).It will weld broken metallic objects such as a ring, a chain link, a medallion, or a slender dagger, providing but one break exists.

Ceramic or wooden objects with multiple breaks can be invisibly rejoined to be as strong as new. A hole in a leather sack or a wineskin is completely healed over by mending...

Okay, so starting with Mending it is clear that it just fixes breaks and tears. There is nothing to say that it can create new material to replace what was previously lost.

Make Whole : This spell functions like mending, except that make whole completely repairs an object made of any substance, even one with multiple breaks, to be as strong as new... The spell does not repair items that have been warped, burned, disintegrated, ground to powder, melted, or vaporized...

Make Whole simply takes this up a notch, repairing any amount of breaks on any substance, but once again there is no mention of creating replacement material. All it does is 'invisibly rejoin' parts of existing items.

It's basically an infinite amount of magical super-glue.

Pathfinder

You may find it useful to know that in Pathfinder it is explicitly stated that you require all the pieces of the item for Make Whole to work.

Make Whole:

This spell functions as mending, except that it repairs 1d6 points of damage per level when cast on an object or construct creature (maximum 5d6).

Mending

All of the pieces of an object must be present for this spell to function.

You had better go looking for those other two pieces!

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    \$\begingroup\$ Historical note: Back in 3.5rd edition, the Make Whole spell did not require all the parts of the broken object to be present - which forced more than a few GMs to deal with ship of Theseus questions. \$\endgroup\$ – GMJoe Sep 15 '16 at 5:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Actually OP was asking about 3.5, not PF (unless the tags were changed after the fact) \$\endgroup\$ – Ben-Jamin Sep 16 '16 at 17:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Ben-Jamin Good call, I think the tags did get changed around at some point, I'll update the question. \$\endgroup\$ – Phlyk Sep 16 '16 at 20:13
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Yes/Maybe/Up to DM (I hate the last statement)

As you can see below, the spell specifically identifies 7 situations that are NOT "mended" by this spell ("warped, burned, disintegrated, ground to powder, melted, or vaporized...or creatures") but does not identify missing pieces as a condition that does not work.

Additionally, the spell mentions multiple breaks but again remains silent on missing pieces. While RAW it's not explicitly prohibited, different DMs may rule differently based on this omission since it's not explicitly authorized either. (As evidenced by 2 different answers to your question even though we both cite the same source.)

Make Whole

This spell functions like mending, except that make whole completely repairs an object made of any substance, even one with multiple breaks, to be as strong as new. The spell does not restore the magical abilities of a broken magic item made whole, and it cannot mend broken magic rods, staffs, or wands. The spell does not repair items that have been warped, burned, disintegrated, ground to powder, melted, or vaporized, nor does it affect creatures (including constructs).

Mending:

Mending repairs small breaks or tears in objects (but not warps, such as might be caused by a warp wood spell). It will weld broken metallic objects such as a ring, a chain link, a medallion, or a slender dagger, providing but one break exists.
Ceramic or wooden objects with multiple breaks can be invisibly rejoined to be as strong as new. A hole in a leather sack or a wineskin is completely healed over by mending. The spell can repair a magic item, but the item’s magical abilities are not restored. The spell cannot mend broken magic rods, staffs, or wands, nor does it affect creatures (including constructs).

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