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Talking is a free action and it can be done on someone else's turn; it says that specifically in the rules. Dropping prone is also considered a free action; but I'm quite sure that you can not drop prone on someone else's turn; for instance, right when they are swinging at you? I come to quickening a spell or power and I think, you are casting very fast but on someone else's turn fast? This is my question, which type of free action is a quickened spell or power considered? On your turn only or on anyone's turn?

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OK, part of what’s going on here is a bit of 3.5 history: Quicken Spell was changed part way through 3.5’s lifecycle.

Originally, Quicken Spell used a free action, and was furthermore limited to only once per round.

Later, it was errata’d to use a swift action.

Why the change? Swift actions didn’t exist when Quicken Spell was first printed. They were introduced later (originally in Miniatures Handbook, if I recall correctly). Basically, Wizards realized that the “free action, 1/round” casting time of Quickened spells (and some others) was a useful mechanic that could be applied more broadly than just those spells, but didn’t want you to be able to use all of them at once (since their 1/round limits would be independent of one another). Hence swift actions, and errata for Quicken Spell (and feather fall).

Now, this errata did not change whether or not a Quickened spell could be used out of turn: they never could. Even though Quicken Spell originally specified free actions, free actions cannot usually be used out of turn. Talking is, of course, the major exception to that:

Free actions don’t take any time at all, though there may be limits to the number of free actions you can perform in a turn.

In general, speaking is a free action that you can perform even when it isn’t your turn.

When Quicken Spell was changed to use a swift action instead of a 1/round free action, the only thing that really changed was that it started to interfere with other swift actions (which were all new anyway), and the idea of gaining extra swift actions became a possibility (although this effect remained extremely rare; the ruby knight vindicator prestige class is the only option for this that I can think of).

For the record, being able to cast any spell you like (rather those specifically designed that way) out of turn would be impossibly overpowered.

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Casting a quickened spell is a swift action in D&D 3.5e, which means that it must be done on your turn, as only immediate actions can be done out of turn during combat.

A swift action consumes a very small amount of time, but represents a larger expenditure of effort and energy than a free action. You can perform one swift action per turn without affecting your ability to perform other actions. In that regard, a swift action is like a free action. However, you can perform only a single swift action per turn, regardless of what other actions you take. You can take a swift action any time you would normally be allowed to take a free action. Swift actions usually involve spellcasting or the activation of magic items; many characters (especially those who don't cast spells) never have an opportunity to take a swift action.

Casting a quickened spell is a swift action. In addition, casting any spell with a casting time of 1 swift action is a swift action.

Casting a spell with a casting time of 1 swift action does not provoke attacks of opportunity.

This might seem like it would allow for a swift action to be taken out-of-turn as a free action, however the description of an immediate action solves this issue:

An immediate action is very similar to a swift action, but can be performed at any time — even if it's not your turn.

Which indicates that a swift action should be on your turn and your turn only.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I can not find that anywhere, I've looked over D&D wiki and the Players handbook both tell me it's a free action? \$\endgroup\$
    – Craigamore
    Oct 19 '16 at 2:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ It is a free action, but most free actions still have to be done on your turn, while immediate actions and reactions are used out-of-turn. See d20srd.org/srd/combat/actionsInCombat.htm \$\endgroup\$
    – QuantumDM
    Oct 19 '16 at 2:56
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Craigamore It was updated when the concepts of swift and immediate actions were differentiated. Swifts are your-turn-only and immiates are not. They are both limited in quantity. For more detail, see KRyan's answer. \$\endgroup\$
    – Weckar E.
    Oct 19 '16 at 12:00
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The Quicken Spell feat says:

Casting a quickened spell is an swift action. You can perform another action, even casting another spell, in the same round as you cast a quickened spell.

Action types are as follows:

Free actions consume a very small amount of time and effort. You can perform one or more free actions while taking another action normally. However, there are reasonable limits on what you can really do for free.

A swift action consumes a very small amount of time, but represents a larger expenditure of effort and energy than a free action. You can perform only a single swift action per turn.

An immediate action is very similar to a swift action, but can be performed at any time — even if it's not your turn.

So, a quickened spell is a swift action not a free action.
Neither of which can be done outside of your turn - only immediate actions can.

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