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So I'm starting a new campaign playing as a Dwarven Runesmith, set in the Warhammer world. The DM has decided to use the Variant rule for carrying capacity: Encumbrance. I think that this is a much better system, however I'm a bit confused as too what counted as "carried equipment". To use the example of my character: I have a backpack and other equipment stored on my person, I have no doubt that this would count towards the weight I'm carrying. However I'm unsure as to whether my armour counts as I have proficiency in wearing it. Also would weapons count? I imagine that they do if they're stored on me in their holders, but what about when I am holding them? The same can be asked for my shield.

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Yes, armour counts towards encumbrance. If you're wearing 65lb plate armour, it doesn't count as weighing nothing because you're trained in its use. Weapons also count: lugging around a maul or pike weighs you down.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Simple solid answer, perhaps emphasise that "doesn't" e.g. as "does not" , or perhaps rephrase to get rid of that "because" sub-phrase at the end. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil Slater Nov 24 '16 at 19:00
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    \$\begingroup\$ A quote from the rulebook would be a nice addition to this answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Meta4ic Nov 24 '16 at 20:25
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    \$\begingroup\$ Quotes aren't really necessary here. Items wouldn't have a weight associated with them if they were weightless. Proficiency with items determines your ability to use them effectively, not how much they weigh. \$\endgroup\$ – Lino Frank Ciaralli Nov 24 '16 at 22:52
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Anything that requires you to exert more force or spend more energy to move counts towards encumbrance. If you're carrying a heavy box in a warehouse, it is still difficult to walk regardless of whether or not it is strapped to you.

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    \$\begingroup\$ When all rules are subject to GM decision, it's redundant to point that out and weakens the answer. So I've removed that paragraph — it goes without saying. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Nov 24 '16 at 20:21

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