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Let us say my Archmage wins the Initiative and acts first. He uses Wild Arcana to cast Fox Cunning. But he has not perceived the rogue coming from behind. The rogue hits my Wizard. Now he could use Mirror Dodge as an immediate action?

But... he has used up a standard action and a swift action already. Does this mean that I always have to trigger on the rogue to see if he hits me or not. If so I use mirror dodge if not I can use Wild Arcana or other swift actions?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ RE: "Does this mean that I always have to trigger on the rogue to see if he hits me or not. If so I use mirror dodge if not I can use Wild Arcana or other swift actions?" Can this be rephrased? I'm unsure if the answers are addressing these concerns. \$\endgroup\$ – Hey I Can Chan Dec 20 '16 at 20:30
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You can still use Mirror Dodge.

From the PFSRD (emphasis mine):

Immediate Actions
... You cannot use another immediate action or a swift action until after your next turn if you have used an immediate action when it is not currently your turn (effectively, using an immediate action before your turn is equivalent to using your swift action for the coming turn).

Immediate actions use up your swift action for your next turn, so you could Wild Arcana the turn before using Mirror Dodge, but not on the turn after using Mirror Dodge.

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Yes, you can use Mirror Dodge.

On your turn you used a standard and a swift action (plus probably a move action). So far so good.

Later in the initiative order you are attacked by the sneaky Rogue and you wish to use an immediate action to cast a spell.

Immediate Actions

Much like a swift action, an immediate action consumes a very small amount of time but represents a larger expenditure of effort and energy than a free action. However, unlike a swift action, an immediate action can be performed at any time—even if it's not your turn.

No problems here. An immediate action can be performed at any time, even when it isn't your turn.

But this is where the confusion comes in. As you stated, immediate and swift actions kind of use up the same action 'slot' and you can't use both in the same turn.

Using an immediate action on your turn is the same as using a swift action and counts as your swift action for that turn.

But fortunately you aren't using the immediate action on your turn, but rather as part of your subsequent one.

You cannot use another immediate action or a swift action until after your next turn if you have used an immediate action when it is not currently your turn (effectively, using an immediate action before your turn is equivalent to using your swift action for the coming turn).

Here we can see that using an immediate action actually restricts whether you can perform a swift action on your next turn. Think of an immediate action as 'borrowing' the swift action from your next turn.

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