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If I create a e.g. a Wand of True Strike I do not really know who the target is cause the spell Target is 'you'.

Does this mean that since I have created the Wand only I can be the target or if e.g. my familiar uses the Wand to cast True Strike it can use it only on itself?

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Typically a wand's activator—not its creator—makes decisions about the spell cast from a wand (unless, of course, creator and activator are currently the same creature!). For example, despite the spell true strike saying Target: You, the wand's creator doesn't and can't designate himself as the sole beneficiary ever of the wand's effect. Although it would be kind of awesome to create a magic item that, when activated by anybody, gave the magic item's creator the benefits of the spell true strike, that's not how a wand of true strike works.

Instead, a wand of true strike can be employed by any creature that can activate the wand, whether that's because, for instance, the creature has the spell true strike on its spell list or the creature makes a successful Use Magic Device skill check to use a wand (DC 20). And when the wand's activated, the activator makes decisions about the spell, which, in the case of the spell true strike, is usually pretty easy since there aren't any decisions to make: the true strike spell targets you, and the spell's range is personal. (How the spell's effect is put to use—that is, Who do you attack?—is a totally separate decision, entirely different from deciding on the the spell's effect!)

The wand's activator is usually the only one who benefits from the wand's true strike spell because of the true strike spell's entry of Target: You; if another creature wants to benefit from the wand of true strike then that creature itself must activate the wand. (Note that, because a typical familiar has the special ability share spells, a wizard that activates a wand of true strike could opt to have the wand's true strike effect affect his familiar instead of the wizard himself. Also, because Pathfinder, numerous other exceptions exist.)

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What is a wand and what does it do...

A wand is a thin baton that contains a single spell of 4th level or lower.


Activation: Wands use the spell trigger activation method, so casting a spell from a wand is usually a standard action that doesn't provoke attacks of opportunity. (If the spell being cast has a longer casting time than 1 action, however, it takes that long to cast the spell from a wand.) To activate a wand, a character must hold it in hand (or whatever passes for a hand, for non-humanoid creatures) and point it in the general direction of the target or area. A wand may be used while grappling or while swallowed whole.


Spell Trigger: Spell trigger activation is similar to spell completion, but it's even simpler. No gestures or spell finishing is needed, just a special knowledge of spellcasting that an appropriate character would know, and a single word that must be spoken. Spell trigger items can be used by anyone whose class can cast the corresponding spell. This is the case even for a character who can't actually cast spells, such as a 3rd-level paladin. The user must still determine what spell is stored in the item before she can activate it. Activating a spell trigger item is a standard action and does not provoke attacks of opportunity.


As long as the spell is of appropriate spell-level, and can be cast within the confines of a spell-trigger item, then a wand can be produced with any target. Basically, using a wand is no different than actually casting the spell. You are just using the wand to cast it, rather than your hands.

In Summation

Casting the spell through a wand is not really any different than actually casting the spell. Spell limitations that exist within the spell itself, are transferred into the wand application of the spell, as well.

If the spell within a wand states Target: You, then that also applies to the wand.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I an not clear on what this answer suggests. \$\endgroup\$ – Jared Goguen Jan 17 '17 at 22:08
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It only means that when you cast the spell (or use the wand) the spell apply or you (the caster). You can't for example cast it on the warrior.

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