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During our last session, we were fighting two bosses, who I believe were demons. They had the ability to disappear, and travel around. The first one vanished, and according the DM left the fight completely. We had been doing some solid damage to the other, so being a Necromancer Wizard, I cast the cantrip Chill Touch.

You create a ghostly, skeletal hand in the space of a creature within range. Make a ranged spell attack against the creature to assail it with the chill of the grave. On a hit, the target takes 1d8 necrotic damage, and it can't regain hit points until the start of your next turn. Until then, the hand clings to the target.

My ranged attack was successful, so the hand remained holding the boss. On her next turn, the DM had it vanish, and leave the battle as well, giving us victory. However, I tried to argue that the hand would have been able to prevent it from vanishing as I had a solid grip on it. The creatures don't teleport, they just turn invisible and move. We didn't see anything in the handbooks, so I deferred to the DM's ruling. However, we both were curious if we got the ruling correct. Is there something that we missed? Does the hand give me the ability to prevent that boss from escaping, or even a regular enemy from moving?

A couple other points

  • Not remembering what race the enemy was: It was only taking full damage from silver weapons, and this necrotic damage was the only spell type that it did not take half damage, or none at all. Also, it was not an undead target, as would be affected by the rest of the above cantrip.
  • We're only level 4, and I'm not sure if the spell would get more powerful at later levels.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ @KorvinStarmast Talking my DM, it was a demon. However, he said the same thing that Jihelu did in his answer: Invisibility is a level 2 spell, and a cantrip is by definition a level 0. Since there's nothing about the hand having any sort of power, then it would only stay revealed while the boss was within the building. \$\endgroup\$ – krillgar Feb 4 '17 at 22:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ OK. There are some creatures (like a pixie) that can turn invisible without casting a spell, but I am not sure if that will impact on your situation. \$\endgroup\$ – KorvinStarmast Feb 4 '17 at 23:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @KorvinStarmast I'm fairly certain it was a demon. He showed us a pic, and I said it looked like a devil. He said something like "Oh you don't want to face those. Not yet." I'm just thinking that I reversed them. \$\endgroup\$ – krillgar Feb 5 '17 at 3:10
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The creatures don't teleport, they just turn invisible and move.

This is the big kicker to the question.

If the creatures are turning invisible the DM should have told you a few things but I suppose the first creature could have been ignored due to the heat of battle. Invisible creatures can still make noise, so unless the demons were sneaky and tiptoed right as they went Invis or if perception checks weren't had to hear it running off or something I would say that's the first issue. They also still leave tracks

As for stopping the invisibility.

Chill touch says:

On a hit, the target takes 1d8 necrotic damage, and it can't regain hit points until the start of your next turn. Until then, the hand clings to the target.

So the creature took damage, THEN went invisible. So it wouldn't contest it's concentration, if it were magic, and chill touch doesn't mention anything explicit about stopping invisibility.

Invisibility, the level two spell says:

A creature you touch becomes invisible until the spell ends. Anything the target is wearing or carrying is invisible as long as it is on the target's person. The spell ends for a target that attacks or casts a spell.

The invisible condition:

  • An invisible creature is impossible to see without the aid of magic or a special sense. For the purpose of hiding, the creature is heavily obscured. The creature’s location can be detected by any noise it makes or any tracks it leaves.

  • Attack rolls against the creature have disadvantage, and the creature’s attack rolls have advantage.

Invisibility doesn't mention being ended just because one is being touched by something. However, I would find it very hard to argue a ghostly hand is being carried or worn. Until it was your turn, so it would have been up to your allies, they would have seen the hand clinging to the now invisible creature. This could have possibly nullified the disadvantage required to hit invisible creatures, but they would have had to done something quickly.

"Does the hand give me the ability to prevent that boss from escaping, or even a regular enemy from moving?"

No The spell does not mention this in its description so it doesn't happen. However You would be able to see where the creature last was, giving you a chance to assault the creature again with chill touch and track it's movements with ease. This is a short term solution and unreliable due to the disadvantage you would gain on the attack.

In short...

The only thing I would say your DM missed would be having the party able to see where the creature was moving and being able to try and stop it because of Chill touch. You can't really end the creatures invisibility with any of these methods. These are mostly work arounds.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks! I did forget to mention that they were winged, so we did know that they (or their minions in a previous battle) had flown. When the boss disappeared, it also escaped immediately, so no one else would have been able to try and stop her. \$\endgroup\$ – krillgar Feb 4 '17 at 22:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would say the "escaped immediately" thing is in bad taste UNLESS they could move their full move and have been out of the building. Being invisible doesn't circumvent normal movements. It also is your DM's discretion. Hope you have fun in your campaign! @krillgar \$\endgroup\$ – Jihelu Feb 4 '17 at 22:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, they were really close to the door of the Town Hall. \$\endgroup\$ – krillgar Feb 4 '17 at 22:51

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