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Basically, according to the core rulebook, Movement of the Mind works as such; objects may be moved based on level and weight, in the following manner:

1) One pound

2) 20 pounds

3) 200 pounds

4) 500 pounds

5) 1000 pounds

Now being very scientifically minded, this got my mind buzzing. Let's say I have 2 dots in MotM, which means according to the rules I can move up to 20 pounds/10kg of weight as fast as the character can run. For sake of easy calculation I'll say, being a vampire, that I can run as fast as the fastest human runners (Usain Bolt) who has an acceleration of about 10 m/s^2, which means that a 10 kg object accelerating at 10m/s^2 has a force of 100N (newtons). So let's say that 100N is my max force possible.

Now let's take a small rock, that weighs 50g (about 2 oz). According to the previous calculation, (F=m*a) I can accelerate the object up to 100N of force, or F/m=a which comes to 100N/0.005kg = 2*10^4 m/s^2 or 20000m/s^2. This is obviously absurdly abusable, but I was just wondering if this is correct or am I missing something?

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RPG physics ≠ real physics.

Alas, it doesn't quite work that way. The ability says that you can move up to 20 pounds/10kg of weight as fast as you can run. It doesn't say anything about applying force to accomplish that.

Instead, the ability appears to directly modify the velocity vector of the object in question, setting it to "your max speed" and the desired direction. But wait, you say, that's a violation of the laws of physics? Well, I only have two words for you: vampire magic.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ RPG physics != real physics is quite a good point. But a rogue Tremere who kills by committing firearm style murders, while baffling the police and causing our players to enter the scene sounds quite amusing for a game I plan on mastering. Thanks for your answer, I'll select it as preferred! \$\endgroup\$ – Morgormir Feb 26 '17 at 23:57

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