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My friend told me that he disallows playing the standard Druid, Cleric and Wizard, because they, being T1 classes, can prepare new spells every day and no problem will take more than 24 hours to get the needed tool if they don't have one yet, especially at later levels — it's just a matter of preparing the right spells.

Instead of the Wizard, he suggests people to play the Sorcerer, and instead of the Druid and Cleric, to use the D&D 3.5e Spontaneous Divine Casters variant class rules with the Pathfinder Druid and Cleric, which he says are fully compatible with these variant rules.

What tier are the Druid and Cleric when using the ported variant spellcasting?

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    \$\begingroup\$ At worst this is two deeply related questions, that seem far more convenient to answer together than separately. \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Mar 9 '17 at 21:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Baskakov_Dmitriy Please confirm with your friend which classes answers are supposed to be written about. If he does intend to use the 3.5e variant rule with Pathfinder, we need that to be explicit. Otherwise the mismatch and lack of explanation for the mismatch will be confusing readers for years to come, and it will sooner or later be closed as unclear for that reason, whether it's reopened now or not. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie Mar 9 '17 at 22:33
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    \$\begingroup\$ For a Pathfinder "spontaneous cleric", check out the Oracle: paizo.com/pathfinderRPG/prd/advancedPlayersGuide/baseClasses/… \$\endgroup\$ – Karelzarath Mar 9 '17 at 22:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Baskakov_Dmitriy Well, oracle is a spontaneous divine spellcaster, that uses the cleric list and can therefore be thought of as being to the cleric as sorcerer is to the wizard. I don’t think there are any spontaneous spellcasting classes using the druid’s list, though. (Ultimately, whatever he meant, it doesn’t really change the answer to the question, though.) \$\endgroup\$ – KRyan Mar 9 '17 at 23:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ @KRyan He explicitely confirmed that he meant to port the 3.5 rules, saying that they are almost fully compatible with Pathfinder. \$\endgroup\$ – Baskakov_Dmitriy Mar 9 '17 at 23:36
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Tier 2.

The quintessential tier 1-2 divide is sorcerer and wizard. They both have access to the same (fantastically powerful) spell list, but the wizard can choose exactly the spells he needs every day, while the sorcerer is locked into the (still fantastically powerful) spells he’s chosen to learn. One glib way to put the distinction is “a tier 2 can do anything; a tier 1 can do everything.

It’s difficult to make claims about the relative power of classes within a tier (and, for that matter, tiers are not strictly about power to begin with), but (with the nerfs to wild shape since 3.5), druid is generally regarded as the worst of the tier-1 classes (worst of the best is still pretty good, obviously). Made spontaneous, the druid would thus drop to the bottom of the tier-2 classes, most likely. On the other hand, half-elf sorcerers, between their eligibility to take the incredible human favored class bonus (“+1 spell known; must be of a level 1 less than max”) and the paragon surge spell, are very-nearly tier 1, arguably competitive with the prepared-spellcasting druid.

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