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The 5e PHB states:

While you're mounted, you have two options. You can either control the mount or allow it to act independently.

It then describes a number of situations where that choice is made for you (e.g. you cannot control an intelligent mount nor a mount that refuses a rider).

There don't seem to be any situations in which you are required to not choose to let your mount act independently. For example, you could allow your warhorse to act on its own initiative, potentially granting you extra attacks and other options.

Is this correct? There seems to be resistance to the idea that non-intelligent mounts can be allowed to act independently.

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marked as duplicate by Dale M dnd-5e Mar 16 '17 at 23:49

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Note that an unintelligent animal, even one trained for war, will almost certainly run away from combat if allowed to act on its own. That's why you need to control them in the first place. \$\endgroup\$ – Erik Mar 17 '17 at 10:21
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You absolutely can let your unintelligent act on its own. You correctly saw that a mount's initiative only changes if you control it,wanting you can choose not to.

In that case, the GM decides what your mount does. It might charge into battle, or it might turn and run. These are the risks you are taking when not controlling your mount.

However, there are no benefits I am aware of that you could get by allowing your mount to move on its own. Opportunity Attacks are triggered when your target willingly moves out of range, not when you move away, or either of you are forced to move away.

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