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Minor Illusion can be up to a 5 cu ft in dimension as described in the spell. Any thing that touches the Illusion goes through it like it would a hologram then, right? Can you then hide inside the 5 cu ft dimension the Illusion occupies? While not truly invisible can one at the least get advantage to Stealth from it?

In the same vein, can you then cast Minor Illusion on yourself to make yourself look like a part of the environment to get an advantage on Stealth?

I had an idea for a Ninja/Sorcerer to Quicken cast Prestidigitation (flash/smoke bomb) and Minor Illusion together a la "Ninja Vanish" and to look like I've disappeared but still be there waiting for them to leave thinking I gave them the slip. Yes Misty Step can technically do that but I want to save that as a panic button to save myself from a potential early religious or infernal experience.

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marked as duplicate by Purple Monkey, Miniman dnd-5e Apr 2 '17 at 22:59

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    \$\begingroup\$ Note that a 5-foot cube is not five cubic feet. A 5-foot cube means a cube which is five feet in each linear dimension. This results in a cube which is 125 cubic feet. \$\endgroup\$ – Gregory Avery-Weir Apr 3 '17 at 3:26
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    \$\begingroup\$ This is two questions. If the first is a duplicate, perhaps the second (disguised as part of the environment) is not. \$\endgroup\$ – keithcurtis Apr 5 '17 at 23:38
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When I've played a gnome rogue with Minor Illusion, or GMed one, we've ruled that you can Hide inside a Minor Illusion of a barrel, or behind a Minor Illusion of a wall, in the same way that you could hide behind a real one. However, the text of the spell says that you create an illusion of a stationary object. Directly disguising oneself - particularly from multiple angles - strikes me as firmly outside the scope.

Hence you could throw your flash bomb and mostly-disappear behind something, and you might get away with it if you're next to a wall and no one investigates, but an opaque object suddenly appearing in the middle of a room would be pretty suspicious and probably not help you.

That's the simulationist aspect. From a game perspective, you're trying to achieve the effect of a 2nd-level spell (invisibility) with a cantrip that can be cast at will. In general, at my table I reward creative use of spells, but I draw the line at doing something that a higher-level spell is explicitly required for.

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    \$\begingroup\$ "Directly disguising oneself - particularly from multiple angles - strikes me as firmly outside the scope." I've seen this argument from a lot of different people but it strikes me as incorrect. The object is still 3-dimensional (think hologram), so multiple angles shouldn't be a problem. Also, what is to prevent minor illusion from creating a 5' cube that on each side looks like the scenery that is directly behind it, thus creating the effect of an "invisible" cube which one could hide behind? \$\endgroup\$ – LegendaryDude Apr 3 '17 at 19:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ Have you ever tried it IRL? Making things look like other things is hard. Best-case scenario, you're in an empty room of featureless stone, and you can surround yourself with an illusionary 5' cube of stone. But you won't exactly match the wall behind you from every angle. And if there are any trees, or torches, or other people in the room, it will be blatantly obvious when they disappear behind you. \$\endgroup\$ – SirTechSpec Apr 5 '17 at 15:44
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    \$\begingroup\$ Are you asking if I have ever tried casting a magical illusion in real life? \$\endgroup\$ – LegendaryDude Apr 5 '17 at 16:07
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    \$\begingroup\$ Saying that minor illusion used for obscurement is equivalent to Invisibility is bizarre. Minor Illusion creates stationary vision blocks, that pin the player behind a relatively obvious object, and last for only one minute. The opponents can easily keep track of the player, even if they can't see them. Invisibility is mobile, total, and subtle obscurement that lasts for an hour. The power gap is appropriate, even if Minor Illusion can imitate one feature of invisibility. \$\endgroup\$ – Emmett R. Oct 13 '18 at 1:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ @emmett-r Your use of "relatively obvious object" suggests you're envisioning a crate or something, which as I state at the beginning of my answer, I have no problem with. You can in their words "hide inside the illusion". But OP also wants to "look like a part of the environment" and disappear completely, like a ninja. That doesn't fly with me. \$\endgroup\$ – SirTechSpec Oct 15 '18 at 5:00

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