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Creating an eldritch archer magus in a party that doesn't have a dedicated healer. Magi have access to celestial healing and by combining the reach spellstrike and distant spellstrike arcana, it's possible to cast a touch spell from afar when used in combination with a ranged weapon attack.

A bow with blunt arrows seems to be the obvious choice for this kind of job - cheap, nonlethal damage that will quickly be healed by the spell anyway. I just want to know if I still need to make an attack roll to hit my allies, or if it will always hit as long as they are willing to take my arrows.

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Yes, it does.

Any attack, touch or not, requires an attack roll. Spellstrike does not change how attacks works, it simply allows you to attempt to deliver a spell to whoever you hit with your attacks.

Whenever a magus casts a spell with a range of “touch” from the magus spell list, he can deliver the spell through any weapon he is wielding as part of a melee attack.

Ranged spellstrike simply changes the requeriment from a melee attack to a ranged attack.

You may be confusing the rule about being a willing target, which allows you to ignore the saving throw and automatically be affected by the spell targeting your character.

Some spells restrict you to willing targets only. Declaring yourself as a willing target is something that can be done at any time (even if you’re flat-footed or it isn’t your turn). Unconscious creatures are automatically considered willing, but a character who is conscious but immobile or helpless (such as one who is bound, cowering, grappling, paralyzed, pinned, or stunned) is not automatically willing.

Voluntarily Giving up a Saving Throw

A creature can voluntarily forgo a saving throw and willingly accept a spell’s result. Even a character with a special resistance to magic can suppress this quality.

Touching a willing target with spell does not require an attack roll. But this is not what you are doing here. You are using an attack to deliver a touch spell.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Comments are not for extended discussion; this conversation has been moved to chat. \$\endgroup\$ – SevenSidedDie May 9 '17 at 14:56

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