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For questions about the practical arts and methods applied to gamemastering (GMing).

5
votes
Use the fun principle Is it going to be more fun for everyone for the player to gradually discover the error of his ways, or is that going to end up being painful, or tedious, or in any other way un- …
answered May 3 '16 by Novak
5
votes
Let the players do the work, if possible, not you. Honestly, two sessions is not a lot of lost time to make up for; it is below the threshold where I would actually worry about it, too much. My pr …
answered Nov 15 '16 by Novak
2
votes
Yes, it makes perfect sense. My taxonomy is: Die rolls with immediate, unambiguous knowledge of success or failure Let the players make these. I am thinking about rolls to lift things, rolls to hi …
answered Mar 9 '16 by Novak
23
votes
I happen to fall on both sides of this dilemma, depending on whether I'm a player or a GM. What you and your players are asking for is certainty and/or foreknowledge of the results: Can we safely …
answered Jun 27 '17 by Novak
3
votes
You can always ask, but they can always say no. Your best strategy is to make this arrangement mutually beneficial, and in my experience (both as player and as GM) that's not actually difficult. If …
answered Jan 7 '18 by Novak
4
votes
Freedom to do anything also implies the freedom to be ordinary, i.e., specifically, to take ordinary classes and roles. I think the titular question(1) "Make the players use unlimited freedom?" (Emph …
answered Aug 16 '17 by Novak
4
votes
I think this question is still a bit too broad, but I'll answer the part (about mechanics, specifically) that I'm sure is not. Here are some things you can do when your players know the mechanics of …
answered Jul 26 '17 by Novak
25
votes
The Framework I am hesitant to answer this as purely "Talk to your players," but this will come close and it is the almost necessarily first step. Talk to your disruptive player. It's important …
answered Apr 26 '17 by Novak
18
votes
Escalation, especially public escalation is almost always the wrong answer-- like every group activity, playing in or running a game is an exercise in social capital. Ideally, everyone has fun, every …
answered Feb 2 '16 by Novak
1
vote
You're asking a lot of implicit questions here, in addition to the explicit one. I'll try to answer as many of them as I can. Explicit: What are the consequences of telling my players what their ch …
answered Dec 5 '18 by Novak
3
votes
I will give one bad way (in my experience) to handle it, so you are not tempted to try it: Separate the players based on player character location. This sort of meta-gaming used to bother me a lot …
answered Apr 17 '16 by Novak
0
votes
One of the most successful extended scenes I have ever run was a chase scene through an unfamiliar forest in a D&D 4e campaign. I thought it was successful and had a blast running it, and the players …
answered May 7 '17 by Novak
3
votes
Like several (if not many) of us, I have run games two modes: I think of one as Point of View Theater (or POV Theater) and the other as Omniscient Theater. Critically, I have also, in one very long r …
answered Nov 23 '18 by Novak
2
votes
Start by recognizing that RPGs are not novels, novels are not history, and history isn't an RPG. None of these things are the same as any of the others. RPGs are not novels: Capture is an "option …
answered Jul 2 '17 by Novak
3
votes
Understand that, at the heart of it, RPGs are social games. Both of those words are critically important: They are games, in the ludological sense, which means that they have to be fun. They are so …
answered Dec 3 '15 by Novak

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