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14

The first row of the table means that if you are affecting creatures with exactly one hit die or less (kobolds, for example, had only half a standard hit die) then you roll 4d4 to determine the number affected. The second row of the table means that if you are affecting creatures with anything more than one hit die (technically, "one hit die plus one hit ...


4

First, make sure that Charm Person as one of your first spells Then, charm an archer or a heavily armed warrior to be your meat shield. Or charm two of them. I learned this trick in Original D & D; a friend of mine had, early in his adventuring career, charmed two warriors (2d level fighters) that the party had encountered during an earlyo random ...


3

Full disclosure: I’ve only ever played one low-level fantasy RPG campaign, and it wasn’t Dungeons & Dragons. Let me tell the story of how my level 2 halfling mage helped clear out a temple haunted by a malevolent, sentient tree. My mage, let’s call him Jeff (I cannot recall his actual name) was actually more of an involontary travelling scholar. At ...


7

They should support the others They have a ranged weapon (throw a rock, if nothing else). They can keep watch in case someone is sneaking up on the group while they are occupied with the fight. They can warn about reinforcements. If there is a lone weak enemy, maybe they can finish that one off. They can keep watch at the boss, trying to see if they have a ...


8

Hire some henchmen. One aspect of early play that is very different from modern play is the idea that each player would be playing a whole team, not just one PC. Look to the Charisma table that an average character is allowed to have up to 4 henchmen, and at the top-level up to 15 (subject to hiring, payments, morale and so forth). Some of my current ...


1

If you can meet the class minimums without using your best score, then put it in Constitution. Low-level monks tend to die like flies, and a Constitution bonus to hit points improves your chances dramatically. Also, use darts, and throw them at enemy spell-casters. Getting to throw three per round gives you decent odds of hitting, and the monk's damage ...


23

A Magic User’s early combat ineffectiveness is consistent with the design goals of AD&D 1e (And the easiest way to make combat more action-packed for a low-level Magic User is to play a newer edition of D&D.) Delayed Gratification as Game Feature Magic Users were designed to start out very weak but then gain amazing powers. Consider this quote ...


56

While there might be some ways to make the combat fun for the mage, you are from a game design perspective trying to fit a square peg into a round hole: The magic user is not meant to have fun during combat. Even more extremely put: The magic user isn't even supposed to fight, ever. The playstyle of a magic user, especially for the early DnD versions, is ...


8

If you're used to later editions of D&D, AD&D's handling of low-level magic-users can seem weird, because it doesn't naturally provide things for them to do every round when the party is in combat. Also, your mix of characters isn't typical for low-level parties as they were played in the eighties. The way it was done at the time was to have parties ...


4

Of the three, Strength is the least needed. My recommendation is, based on the one monk that I played in AD&D that wasn't in a module, Dex > Wis > Str and the reason for that is as follows: You can be proficient with a crossbow. I chose crossbow as my first weapon, since with an AC of 10 I had no desire to be anywhere near the front line at first ...


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